Sacred bleurgh! Garbage bags pile up in French streets as binmen demand a 21 HOUR work week


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Sacred bleurgh! Garbage bags pile up in French streets as binmen demand a 21 HOUR work week (in addition to their nine weeks of annual vacation)

  • Garbage men in Marseille have been on strike for a month over the duration of their work week
  • The council tried to increase their weekly work from 9 p.m. to 35 p.m.
  • As a result of the strike, the council said more than 3,000 tonnes of waste has accumulated
  • Last week a deal was later rejected by the left-wing union
  • Police have now ordered some of the strikers to get back to work to clean it up










Garbage bags are piling up in the streets of France as garbage collectors demand a 21-hour work week, with at least 3,000 tonnes of garbage at risk of being thrown into the sea.

A collective action by garbage workers in Marseille began last month to protest against being told to work longer than their usual 9-hour week.

French police on Thursday ordered trash cans to clean up beach rubbish in order to avoid an ecological disaster in the Mediterranean.

A photo taken on September 30, 2021 shows garbage piled up on a street in Marseille, southern France, during a garbage strike in the city throughout the work week

The Greater Marseille Council was seeking to introduce national legislation that would require public sector employees to work the national 35-hour week from January 1.

Despite being one of the shortest working weeks in the world, many municipal workers – especially in cities like Paris and Marseille – work less than that.

Marseille garbage collectors also benefit from nine weeks of vacation each year. This consists of weeks of annual leave and four weeks of “compensatory rest” to prevent the city’s 3,658 binmen from running out.

Since the strike, the streets of Marseille have quickly filled with thousands of tons of stinking trash, much of which has been washed to beaches by wind and rain.

In response, police said they would force around 60 of the striking binmen to return to work to help clean up the growing mess.

If refused, workers face a maximum penalty of six months in prison and a fine of £ 10,000.

French police on Thursday ordered trash cans to clean up beach rubbish in order to avoid an ecological disaster in the Mediterranean.  Pictured: A man walks past a pile of garbage

French police on Thursday ordered trash cans to clean up beach rubbish in order to avoid an ecological disaster in the Mediterranean. Pictured: A man walks past a pile of garbage

A week ago, an agreement was signed by Force Ouvri̬re Рone of the two main public sector unions in France Рto end the strike.

The binmen will get a pay raise of € 80 per month, no reduction in public holidays and will work 31 hours per week, with council officials conceding that the bin men should work less due to the difficult nature of the work.

However, the far-left union Confédération générale du travail (Confédération générale du travail) rejected the deal, now many garbage men on strike.

The city council said there was now 3,000 tons of uncollected waste in Marseille, with more than 500 residents responding to a call to help clean up the beaches themselves.

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