Marseille Society – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 11:27:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mact-asso.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Marseille Society – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ 32 32 Macron is in a hole of his own making https://mact-asso.org/macron-is-in-a-hole-of-his-own-making/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 11:07:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/macron-is-in-a-hole-of-his-own-making/ French soldiers marched on the Champs Elysees last Wednesday, because after the 2020 coronavirus break, the July 14 celebrations returned to Paris. But it seems that the irony of celebrating the French Revolution and the freedom it symbolized was not lost on everyone, as thousands took to the streets to protest the “sanitary pass” or […]]]>


French soldiers marched on the Champs Elysees last Wednesday, because after the 2020 coronavirus break, the July 14 celebrations returned to Paris. But it seems that the irony of celebrating the French Revolution and the freedom it symbolized was not lost on everyone, as thousands took to the streets to protest the “sanitary pass” or vaccination passport as we know it. It is estimated that 19,000 people demonstrated across France, particularly in Paris, Marseille, Lyon and Toulouse, against the compulsory vaccination of health workers and the widespread use of the health pass.

Last Monday, President Emmanuel Macron announced a number of new Covid measures that should affect anyone keen to live in a free society. From September 15, healthcare staff and people working with the elderly or vulnerable will be required to be vaccinated against Covid. Second, the health pass, already used for large-scale events such as concerts and sports matches, will be extended to cover almost all of public life. As of Wednesday, people will have to show proof of a vaccination, a negative Covid test or a recent recovery from the disease, before being allowed to enter cinemas and theaters. From August, this will be further expanded to include everything from bars and cafes to long-distance train rides. It did not go well: Friday, two vaccination centers were ransacked.

All this to fight against the fourth wave of Covid in France. The number of cases is increasing rapidly and with the more transmissible delta variant now the dominant strain in France, Macron fears an increase in hospitalizations.

In his speech last Monday, the president urged his fellow citizens to get vaccinated as “the only way back to normal life.” Well, maybe Macron should have thought about it in January, when he called the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine “near-ineffective” just hours before it was approved for European use by the European Health Agency. drugs. He and his girlfriend Angela Merkel have been making all kinds of questionable noises about AstraZeneca’s jab, encouraging an already dubious French public to avoid getting the shot. This was beyond irresponsibility, given that it was well known that the French in particular were skeptical of the Covid vaccine – an Ifop survey carried out in December found that 61% of the French did not want a Covid vaccine .

The deployment of the vaccine in France has also been appalling. There was no contact with vulnerable groups asking them to reserve their vaccines, nor clear instructions on how to do so. People had to find out for themselves when they were eligible for a vaccine, and then book through various websites. My Parisian in-laws – both aged 70 – didn’t receive their first jab until the end of March. For comparison, England was already offering vaccines to people over 50 at the end of March. It is no wonder that France is still lagging behind in the number of vaccinations. And yet Macron had the audacity to threaten his fellow citizens with compulsory vaccinations for all, before asserting that, for the moment, he “made the choice to trust” – what generosity. And how dare Macron scold the French for the shit he finds himself in, when it is largely on his own initiative?

Leading through fear seems to have done the trick, however, and 3 million vaccine appointments have been booked since Monday’s announcement. But it’s hardly surprising that people are completely excluded from normal society if they can’t prove their immunization status. As rumors continue in the UK about the introduction of vaccine passports for pubs, restaurants and shops, it is worth considering what this actually means. A passport-vaccine company is a company where medical confidentiality is denied; it is a society in which there are two classes of citizens, the vaccinated and the unvaccinated; and it is a society in which your every move outside your home would be followed by the state. To sum up, or as the French say, “in short”, it is not a free society.

That the head of the country of “freedom, equality, fraternity” now resort to threats of medical interventions mandated by the state and authoritarianism of health cards, such as has never been seen in a democratic country, is utter shame.

One can only hope that the French rediscover the spirit of Bastille, reject Macron’s authoritarianism and regain their freedom. Me, I trust the Parisian waiters. If Macron thinks that even one of the famous disdainful “waiters” of his capital will stop to ask for health papers from a client before slamming “yes?” At home for their order, so he’s really missing a picnic wand.



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Jean-Luc Mélenchon supports the anti-vaccine demonstration called by French neofascists https://mact-asso.org/jean-luc-melenchon-supports-the-anti-vaccine-demonstration-called-by-french-neofascists/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 00:26:25 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/jean-luc-melenchon-supports-the-anti-vaccine-demonstration-called-by-french-neofascists/ On July 17, tens of thousands of people demonstrated in France against mandatory coronavirus vaccination and social distancing restrictions. The protests were called and supported by neo-fascist figures, including Marion Maréchal Le Pen and Florian Philippot, the leader of the Party of Patriots. The protest took place against the backdrop of an increase in COVID-19 […]]]>


On July 17, tens of thousands of people demonstrated in France against mandatory coronavirus vaccination and social distancing restrictions. The protests were called and supported by neo-fascist figures, including Marion Maréchal Le Pen and Florian Philippot, the leader of the Party of Patriots.

The protest took place against the backdrop of an increase in COVID-19 across Europe, driven by the delta variant. The Macron government rejects science-based social distancing policies, including the closure of non-essential workplaces and schools. On the contrary, Macron only proposes that health workers be vaccinated and that a ‘disease pass’ – demonstrating either a complete vaccination, or a recent negative test result, or a recent recovery from the virus – before entering the fields. restaurants and social events. Marshal Le Pen and Philippot themselves denounced compulsory vaccination and any social restriction aimed at saving lives.

Their call to let the virus spread unhindered won support not only from neo-fascist activists, but also within Jean-Luc Mélenchon’s La France insoumise (France rebellious —LFI), as well as a layer of the Greens. Some rebels joined the demonstrations of Philippot and Maréchal, which gathered thousands of people in several demonstrations in Paris, 5,500 in Montpellier, 4,500 in Marseille, 2,800 in Strasbourg, 2,500 in Toulouse and Nantes, 2,000 in Rennes and 1,200 in Perpignan and Nancy.

Anti-vaccine protesters march past a rally in Strasbourg on Saturday, July 17, 2021 (AP Photo / Jean-Francois Badias)

At the head of the march in Paris were Philippot, former leader of the National Rally (RN) of Marine Le Pen; Nicolas Dupont-Aignan of the far-right party Debout la France; and Jacline Mouraud, a known figure of the “yellow vests” who was widely opposed among the demonstrators after having urged them to run for positions within the state apparatus. There were chants of “Macron resignation” and “Liberty”, and placards declaring “No to compulsory vaccination.” Vaccine freedom is a right ”, or“ Hands off our children. “

The demonstration had a heterogeneous character. Among the demonstrators were health workers wanting to denounce Macron’s policy, restaurant owners opposed to the obligation to inspect their customers’ “health passes”, and former “yellow vests”. Jérôme Rodrigues, a well-known figure in the movement whose eye was shot by the police, called for refusing vaccination, but refused to participate in the demonstration led by the neo-fascists.

However, the political character of this demonstration was clearly dominated by the extreme right. In France and around the world, the far right is leading the opposition to a science-guided policy of vaccination and social distancing to contain the virus. This opposition is fundamentally reactionary, given that the pandemic has already claimed more than four million lives worldwide, and 1.1 million in Europe, and is accelerating again.

Philippot praised the tacit support of the police for the policy of spreading the virus, declaring on Twitter: “I meet a surprising number of restaurateurs who have absolutely no intention of supporting the #PassSanitaire [health pass] and, even more unprecedented, police officers telling me that they have no intention of actively enforcing them… Humanity still exists.



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Jarred McGinnis: “You don’t have to be disabled to write about disability, but you better get it right” | fiction https://mact-asso.org/jarred-mcginnis-you-dont-have-to-be-disabled-to-write-about-disability-but-you-better-get-it-right-fiction/ Fri, 16 Jul 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/jarred-mcginnis-you-dont-have-to-be-disabled-to-write-about-disability-but-you-better-get-it-right-fiction/ AAs an author with a visible and physical disability, it was inevitable that I would be asked to write about disability in the literature – I am a paraplegic and a full-time manual wheelchair user, for those who count the points . When I had my spinal cord injury over 20 years ago, I didn’t […]]]>


AAs an author with a visible and physical disability, it was inevitable that I would be asked to write about disability in the literature – I am a paraplegic and a full-time manual wheelchair user, for those who count the points . When I had my spinal cord injury over 20 years ago, I didn’t wake up with a doctorate in disability studies, but was introduced to a menagerie of troubles and prejudices from from people and architecture, which has certainly been an education. It should also be noted that Disability is a Catholic Church, of which we will all be a member at some point in our lives.

One of the most difficult and surprising lessons I have learned is that as a person with a disability you do not have the final say on who you are. It depends on those around you. It’s maddening to deal with on a daily basis and much more difficult than the lack of accessible toilets. This is one of the themes of my novel The coward, in which the life of a young man is turned upside down by a car accident. How do you resolve the dissonance between how you are seen and how you see yourself? This is something that 2016 See red by Chilean writer Lina Meruane, about a woman losing her sight, is doing incredibly well.

The poet Raymond Antrobus explores themes similar to my work – masculinity, disability, family – in his 2018 collection, Perseverance, but achieves its impact without all the extra and narrative details that a prose writer is forced to include.

I don’t choose to read a book because it has a disabled nature: at best, it doesn’t tell me anything about the story and at worst, I know exactly what kind of story I’m going to read. However, I understand that representation is important, and one of the elk for The coward came to see nothing that resembles my understanding of the disabled experience in fiction. In writing it, I sought to undermine the mundane trope of “triumph over adversity” with humor and honesty.

I grew up in Florida and Texas, and the southern literary tradition is full of stories of the marginalized. In a 1960 essay, “Some Aspects of the Grotesque in Southern Fiction”, Flannery O’Connor explained this was because literary orthodoxy relied heavily on stories of “men in gray flannel suits,” when the Southern writer knows these men are the real grotesques. In the 1955 O’Connor story “Good people from the country, Hulga lost her leg in a hunting accident when she was 10 years old. I don’t see a problem with Hulga’s vulnerability to the hands of a preacher ripping off prostheses; the struggle between power and family dynamics in history has never made me question O’Connor’s portrayal of disability. Hulga is a fully realized character drawn by the hand of a 20th century master.

I also love the 1940 Carson McCullers novel The heart is a lonely hunter. Its protagonist John Singer is the deaf mute on whom the other characters project what they need – if there is a perfect metaphor for disability in the able, this is it. This novel captures the sadness and isolation of marginalization like nothing else I have read.

“Perfect Metaphor”: Alan Arkin and Sondra Locke in The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, 1968 Photograph: Everett Collection Inc / Alamy

While not a Southern writer, and not exactly on disability, Katherine Dunn Geek love (1983), presents main characters whose rejection of normality as desirable resonated before and after my life in a wheelchair. There are certainly no “men in gray flannel suits” at the heart of this book. This is the story of Oly, a hunchbacked albino dwarf, who tries to outsmart the devious Arturo, a boy with flippers for his hands and feet, who initiates a cult where the faithful amputate their own limbs. At one point Arturo reportedly said, “I have a glimpse of the horror of normalcy. Each of these innocent people in the street is engulfed in the terror of their own banality. They would do anything to be unique.

Life literally threw me under the bus, but I got up and prospered. Those who do not have a disability seem to me to be children, innocent but inexperienced. They’re worrying. They fear life with a disability and don’t know if they have the strength. I don’t doubt it anymore and it gave me the courage to do things that I might not have done if I hadn’t faced life in a wheelchair. I’ve always been surprised at the vehemence of the response every time I say this, and I think it goes to the heart of people’s insecurity. They take it for granted that they are better than the disabled, and it comes to mind when you suggest otherwise.

For example, our family recently moved from the UK to Marseille. Why not move with your wife and two young children to a country where you don’t speak the language during a pandemic? Well, Brexit, the rise of teleworking, real estate prices, the sun and the sea, to name just a few reasons, but above all, because it didn’t scare me. Compared to a traumatic spinal cord injury, it was going to be easy. After our move, I came across a cultural city tour that included works by Claude McKay, the Harlem Renaissance writer. His novel Romance in Marseille was written in the early 1930s and left unfinished. It was only published recently. It is an African, Lafala, who obtained a settlement because of the negligence of a shipping company which resulted in the amputation of his legs. The fact that her disability is less of a hindrance than her darkness indicates a more nuanced and intersectional understanding of disability, race, class, gender, and sexuality than many recent books openly linked by their identity politics.

My family is limited by my disability. There are still a shocking number of places I cannot go. Two contemporary books which give an honest portrait of a family with a disabled member are Owl song at dawn (2015) by Emma Claire Sweeney, who examines how the perception and care of individuals has changed over time while telling a great story about sisters, and The old king in his exile (2017) by Arno Geiger, which is a dissertation on the author’s father developing Alzheimer’s disease. As I said, at some point we will all have to deal with disability. The truth that emerges from these novels is – and it seems ludicrous to have to write this down – that most families will do anything to make sure their loved ones are well and included.

pillow (2008), the first book in an Adam Mars-Jones trilogy, follows in exquisite richness of detail a young boy, John Cromer, with Still’s disease, a severe form of juvenile arthritis. For the first third of the book, he is in bed and dependent on his parents. Yet it is full of agency. Mars-Jones did a masterful job creating a classic coming-of-age story using the sheer force of voice alone. There is a point in the book where he describes a banana so perfectly that I realized I didn’t have really noticed a banana before. It’s also full of wicked humor – especially one scene, where the young boy, who is gay, hears the facts of his mother’s life and is horrified by what he’s told.

You don’t have to be disabled to write about disability, but you had better get it right. As far as I know, Mars-Jones is valid, but through his art he created a living character full of ideas about himself and possessing a disabled body in a world openly hostile to such bodies. The same goes for non-fiction works such as the 2005s The life of the dwarves by Betty M Adelson, a tender and comprehensive social history of the subject, or the most recent Tell me the planets by Ben Platts-Mills, in which a valid author describes sensitively the challenges faced by people with brain damage during the UK’s austerity program, which appears to be designed to harm the most vulnerable in society.

When I was in the hospital, David Foster Wallace’s 1,000-page tome, Infinite joke, which had just come out in paperback, appeared one morning on my bedside table. Someone had very thoughtfully understood that I would often be in bed. The book’s contiguity between melancholy and humor still resonates with me, as does its understanding of the complexity of depression and addiction. I suspect Foster Wallace had a less nuanced understanding of physical disability, but I appreciated his Quebec radicals, the Assassins of the Rolling Armchairs or the Wheelchair Assassins, who terrorized the main characters. In the hospital, completely dependent on others, he was hopeful to envision an all-powerful obscure cabal of wheelchair-bound men.

Characters with disabilities can be angry, pitiful, depressed, a problem for someone else, or wanting a cure. The problem comes when it is all they are. It is essential to have access to stories where characters with disabilities reflect the experiences we have rather than the experiences we are supposed to be limited to.

Jarred McGinnis Coward is published by Canongate (£ 16.99). To support the Guardian and Observer, purchase a copy at guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply.



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Bukayo Saka urges social media platforms to act after racial abuse https://mact-asso.org/bukayo-saka-urges-social-media-platforms-to-act-after-racial-abuse/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 17:10:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/bukayo-saka-urges-social-media-platforms-to-act-after-racial-abuse/ Arsenal teenager Bukayo Saka urged social media platforms to step up efforts to root out racial abuse after being targeted following his failure at the final Euro 2020 penalty kick. The 19-year-old saw his shot on goal decisively saved by Gianluigi Donnarumma as Italy triumphed at Wembley on Sunday and then received sickening messages from […]]]>


Arsenal teenager Bukayo Saka urged social media platforms to step up efforts to root out racial abuse after being targeted following his failure at the final Euro 2020 penalty kick.

The 19-year-old saw his shot on goal decisively saved by Gianluigi Donnarumma as Italy triumphed at Wembley on Sunday and then received sickening messages from team-mates Marcus Rashford and Jadon Sancho.

In a post on his official Twitter account Thursday, Saka wrote: “On social media platforms Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, I don’t want a child or an adult to have to receive the hateful and hurtful messages that me, Marcus and Jadon have. received this week.

“I instantly knew the kind of hate I was about to receive, and it is a sad reality that your powerful platforms are not doing enough to stop these messages. There is no place for it. racism or hatred of any kind in football or any area of ​​society and for the majority of people who come together to call out to people sending these messages, taking action and reporting these comments to the police and by chasing away hatred by being kind to each other, we will win.

His Arsenal colleague William Saliba joined the Ligue 1 Marseille team on loan for the season. Last season William spent six months on loan with Nice in Ligue 1. During his stint at Nice, the 20-year-old defender made 22 appearances, with the Aiglons ending the campaign in ninth place.

Gunners technical director Edu said: “With William we decided that it would be good for his continued development to spend another season on loan. William joined us at the age of 18, and he didn? ‘m only 20 years old, so he continues to develop all the time.

“William is a player with strong natural abilities and next season has the potential to be really beneficial for him at Marseille, a good club. Playing another season in Ligue 1 will be very important for his development. Suddenly close contact with William during the season and wish him all the best in France with Marseille. “

In other football news, Borussia Dortmund have ruled out selling Erling Braut Haaland this summer amid interest from Chelsea and Man City.

Chelsea boss Thomas Tuchel is keen on Haaland, while City’s Pep Guardiola look to sign a striker this summer following the exit of the club’s top scorer Sergio Aguero, who joined Barcelona on a free transfer.

City have also been heavily linked with England skipper Harry Kane, whose future for Tottenham is uncertain.

The club have already played down speculation linking them to Barcelona’s Antoine Griezmann and Bayern Munich leader Robert Lewandowski, with new Bayern boss Julian Nagelsmann commenting: “Rumors about Robert Lewandowski have been around for ages, I think since he joined Bayern Munich, “he told Sky Germany. “I think that’s normal for someone who scores so many goals that almost all clubs are fumbling.

“I think on the one hand Robert knows what he has in Munich, what he has in this team. I spoke to him and texted him. I don’t like the first official act very much with it. a player consisting in immediately discussing his contractual situation. “

And Dortmund are also determined to reject any offer for Haaland. Although they have pledged to let Jadon Sancho go on a € 80million contract with Man Utd, Dortmund are adamant Sancho is the only “high profile” player they have released.

Barcelona are set to announce that Lionel Messi has signed a contract until 2026 and are in advanced talks to trade Antoine Griezmann for Saúl Ñíguez of Atlético Madrid.

Messi has reached a five-year deal on reduced wages rather than an initially discussed two-year extension. His partnership with Griezmann in attack will end if Barcelona and Atlético finalize the proposed trade involving midfielder Saúl.

Both players are happy with the deal, but negotiations on their respective prices must be concluded, with Barcelona claiming Griezmann’s value is greater than Saúl’s and want money as part of a deal.

Liverpool and Chelsea are keen on Saúl, 26, if he does not end up at Camp Nou. Griezmann left Atlético for Barcelona for € 120m in 2019.

Barcelona have structured Messi’s contract to help them stay within La Liga’s financial fair play rules.

Barcelona have also loaned Austria striker Yusuf Demir to Rapid Vienna for € 500,000 with an option to buy for € 10million, but he is listed as a B team signatory.

* Meanwhile, Gianluigi Donnarumma has made a free transfer to Paris Saint-Germain, signing a five-year contract.



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Will COVID-19 change science? Past pandemics offer clues | Science https://mact-asso.org/will-covid-19-change-science-past-pandemics-offer-clues-science/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 18:35:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/will-covid-19-change-science-past-pandemics-offer-clues-science/ KATTY HUERTAS By Jennifer Couzin-Frankel13 Jul 2021, 14:35 ScienceThe COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation. Sixteen months of the pandemic seemed disorienting and arduous, but along the arc of human history, COVID-19 marks just another inflection point. Epidemics have punctuated the timeline of humanity for centuries, causing panic and killing millions of people, […]]]>


KATTY HUERTAS

By Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

ScienceThe COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation.

Sixteen months of the pandemic seemed disorienting and arduous, but along the arc of human history, COVID-19 marks just another inflection point. Epidemics have punctuated the timeline of humanity for centuries, causing panic and killing millions of people, whether the culprit is plague, smallpox or the flu. And when infections decline, their imprints on society may remain, some short-lived and others long-lasting.

In a series of press articles over the next few months, Science will examine how a new normal is emerging in the scientific world. Of course, COVID-19 is always with us, especially outside the minority of countries now enjoying the fruits of widespread vaccination. Yet, as the pandemic enters a different phase, we ask how research can change, how scientists navigate these waters, and in which directions they choose to navigate.

While the past doesn’t necessarily portend the future, the story of the epidemic sheds light on how change is unfolding. “Historians often say that an epidemic will reveal the underlying flaws,” says Erica Charters, a medical historian at the University of Oxford who studies how epidemics end. But how we respond is up to us. “When we ask, ‘How is the epidemic changing society? This suggests that there is something about the disease that will guide us. But the disease has no action like humans do.

Past epidemics have prompted scientists and doctors to reconsider everything from their understanding of the disease to how they communicate. One of the most studied plagues, the bubonic plague, ravaged Europe in the late 1340s as the Black Death, then sporadically struck parts of Europe, Asia and North Africa over the next 500 years. Caused by bacteria transmitted by bites from infected fleas, features of the plague included grotesquely swollen lymph nodes, seizures and organ failure. The cities were powerless against its spread. In 1630, nearly half of the population of Milan perished. In Marseille, France, in 1720, 60,000 died.

However, the simple recording of these figures underlines the extent to which medicine has reoriented itself in the face of the plague. Until the Black Death, medical writers did not systematically categorize illnesses as separate and often present illness as a generalized physical imbalance. “Diseases were not fixed entities,” writes Frank Snowden, historian of medicine at Yale University, in his book Epidemics and society: from the black plague to the present day. “The flu could turn into dysentery. “

The plague years sparked a more systematic study of infectious disease and spawned a new genre of writing: plague treatises, ranging from concise quarantine pamphlets to long catalogs of potential treatments. Treaties appeared in the Islamic world and in Europe, says Nükhet Varlık, a medical historian at Rutgers University in Newark. “It’s the first disease that gets its own literature,” she says. The disease-specific commentary has been expanded to address other conditions, such as sleeping sickness and smallpox. Even before the invention of the printing press, treaties were apparently divided. Ottoman treatises on the plague often contained marginal notes from doctors commenting on a particular treatment.

The plague and subsequent epidemics also coincided with the rise of epidemiology and public health as disciplines, although some historians question whether disease has always been the driving force. From the 14th to the 16th century, new laws in the Ottoman Empire and parts of Europe required the collection of the death toll during epidemics, Varlık explains. The plague also accelerated the development of prevention tools, including separate quarantine hospitals, social distancing measures and, at the end of the 16th century, contact tracing procedures, says Samuel Cohn, historian of the Middle Ages and of Medicine at the University of Glasgow. “All of these things that a lot of people think are very modern… were designed and developed” at the time. The term “contagio” took off as authorities and doctors sought to determine how the plague had spread.

Cholera, caused by bacteria in water, devastated New York and other areas in the 1800s. It led not only to new sanitation practices, but also to lasting public health institutions. “The statistics had proved what common sense had already known: in any epidemic, those who had the least chance of surviving were those who lived in the worst conditions,” wrote medical historian Charles Rosenberg, today. hui professor emeritus at Harvard University. influential book The years of cholera: the United States in 1832, 1849 and 1866. To improve these conditions, New York City created its Metropolitan Board of Health in 1866. In 1851, the French government organized the first of a series of international health conferences that will span nearly 90 years and help to guiding the founding of the World Health Organization in 1948. Cholera “was the stimulus for the first international meetings and cooperation in public health,” Rosenberg now says.

Meanwhile, efforts to decipher the disease continued: although physicians who viewed germs as culprits remained in the minority in the mid-1800s, the disease “was no longer an incident in a drama of moral choice and spiritual salvation, ”but“ a consequence of man’s interaction with his environment, ”Rosenberg wrote. Fleas were identified as vectors of plague during a global pandemic in the late 1800s and early 1900s, and the concept of insects as vectors of disease has since influenced public health and epidemiology. .

A curious mixture of memories and forgetfulness is at the origin of many epidemics. Some quickly fade from memory, says David Barnes, a medical historian at the University of Pennsylvania. The 1918 flu, which killed an estimated 50 million people worldwide but was also eclipsed by World War I, is a classic example of a forgotten ordeal, he says. “One would expect it to be a revolutionary, transformative, yet very little changed trauma” in its wake. There has been no significant investment in public health infrastructure, no gigantic injection of money into biomedical research. Although the 1918 pandemic helped stimulate a new field of virology, this research progressed slowly until the arrival of the electron microscope in the early 1930s.

In contrast, the emergence of HIV / AIDS in the 1980s left a powerful legacy, says Barnes. A new breed of patient activists fought fiercely for their own survival, demanding rapid access to experimental treatments. They ultimately won the battle, reshaping the policies for subsequent drug approvals. But, “It wasn’t the epidemic itself – the damage, the death toll from AIDS – that made this possible,” Barnes says. “They were organized and persistent activists, truly beyond anything our society had ever seen.”

It is through this lens of the human agency that Barnes and other historians envision the potential scientific legacy of COVID-19. The pandemic, like its predecessors, has shed light on uncomfortable truths, ranging from the impact of societal inequalities on health to waste in clinical trials to paltry investments in public health. Questions arise about how to strengthen the laboratories – financially or otherwise – that have been immobilized by the pandemic.

In the wake of COVID-19, will researchers reshape what they study and how they work, potentially accelerating changes already underway? Or will what Snowden calls “societal amnesia” take hold, fueled by the desire to leave a pandemic behind? The answers will come over the decades. But scientists are starting to shape them now.



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Letter to the editor: anti-vaccines keep getting infected, others https://mact-asso.org/letter-to-the-editor-anti-vaccines-keep-getting-infected-others/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 17:30:05 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/letter-to-the-editor-anti-vaccines-keep-getting-infected-others/ Richard Owen / Woodland Jim Tejeka is the latest anti-vaxxer to complain about how he is discriminated against because he chose not to be vaccinated against COVID-19 (June 30 letter to editor of The Reflector). We heard similar arguments years ago from smokers, who complained about new “discriminatory” restrictions, which violated their constitutional rights (ultimately, […]]]>

Richard Owen / Woodland

Jim Tejeka is the latest anti-vaxxer to complain about how he is discriminated against because he chose not to be vaccinated against COVID-19 (June 30 letter to editor of The Reflector). We heard similar arguments years ago from smokers, who complained about new “discriminatory” restrictions, which violated their constitutional rights (ultimately, to kill themselves and others). I’m so glad Tejeka had negative COVID tests, but what does he say about the 604,000 American dead and the millions more who suffered but ultimately (for the most part) recovered?

He claimed the danger of COVID was diminishing without acknowledging that there was a current resurgence of the delta variant, which appears to be more deadly and more transmissible than the original strain. Infections and deaths are increasing in pockets of our country (and certainly in other parts of the world), where vaccination rates are low, and the overwhelming majority of these infections are in people who have not been vaccinated. . Unfortunately, we will be exposed to delta and other life-threatening emerging variants unless we can develop herd immunity, but this requires a vaccination rate of around 80%. We are currently less than 50 percent fully immunized, mainly thanks to Tejeka and her cohorts.

He made an absurd statement that dictators demand that we be vaccinated. Of course, there is no such requirement, only common sense and decency. Remarkably, he attempted to equate the thalidomide tragedy of the 1960s with the safety of COVID vaccines, however, this drug was never approved by the FDA, nor did it undergo the COVID style of testing and testing. rigorous analyzes by numerous research studies involving tens of thousands of volunteers and patients. He took issue with the 90-95% effectiveness of COVID vaccines and seemed unaware that such a high level is extraordinary. 50 percent efficacy of the vaccine is considered good enough to be approved by the FDA.

Tejeka’s attitude and actions are selfish and reckless at best. At worst, he and his like-minded anti-vaccines continue to infect and infect others, perpetuating suffering and death for those vulnerable to the disease. He has the audacity to equate the mantra “we’re all in the same boat” to how, in a democratic society, we all have the freedom to choose whether or not to receive the vaccine. It would be great if we could together defeat this terrible pandemic by protecting ourselves and our families by receiving the vaccine. I wonder how his attitude could change if he or a member of his family were infected because of his pathetic, misguided and dangerous mission.

Finally, I encourage Tejeka and other anti-vaccines to review the pandemic resolution literature, get a clue, and open their eyes, once they remove their heads from their buttocks.


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Kneeling against racism: EURO 2020 solidarity should not be ‘controversial’ https://mact-asso.org/kneeling-against-racism-euro-2020-solidarity-should-not-be-controversial/ Sun, 11 Jul 2021 18:56:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/kneeling-against-racism-euro-2020-solidarity-should-not-be-controversial/ Monday July 12, 2021, 6:56 a.m.Reviews: Ramzy Baroud Another football ‘controversy’ began when football players participating in the ongoing ‘UEFA Euro 2020’ knelt during the national anthems to protest racism, a serious problem that has plagued football stadiums since. many years. Yet while some players chose to kneel down, others chose not to, offering flimsy […]]]>


Another football ‘controversy’ began when football players participating in the ongoing ‘UEFA Euro 2020’ knelt during the national anthems to protest racism, a serious problem that has plagued football stadiums since. many years.

Yet while some players chose to kneel down, others chose not to, offering flimsy excuses like ‘the players were not ready’ and ‘politics should stay out of football’. Racism in sport is real, although it cannot be separated from racism in society. In fact, reactions to the moral positions adopted by some actors reflected the way in which right-wing, populist and chauvinist movements exert such massive influence over various European societies, as these movements often define the dominant political sensitivities.

For example, the national team of France, largely made up of black and Muslim French players, was attacked by right-wing politicians and media to the point that on June 15 the whole team decided not to sit down. kneel at the start of his matches. , probably fearing racist repercussions.

In the French example, racism in sport prevailed over anti-racist feelings. Worse, the highest football federation in the country, the French Football Federation (FFF) does not even recognize the need to address the issue. The president of the FFF, Noel Le Graet, is said to have declared that racism “does not exist”, following an incident last September during the Marseille-Paris Saint Germain match, when the Brazilian Neymar was called ” monkey mother “during a fight.

Not only are racist incidents in football matches on the rise and well documented in France and elsewhere, but the insult of the ‘monkey’ is particularly popular among European football fans who, sometimes in groups, engage in letting go. This is called “monkey song,” which specifically targets black gamers and other dark-skinned gamers. When the despicable practice in Italy finally gained national attention, an Italian court dismissed the case as “unfounded”, and fans who were caught “singing monkeys” on camera were “acquitted without condition “.

With that in mind, it was unfortunate that only half of the Italian squad knelt in their game against Wales on June 20, and ultimately they decided not to kneel at all during a subsequent match. It is telling that while racism in sport continues to prevail, anti-racist actions are seen as unnecessary and divide.

The truth is that football, like any other sport, is a reflection of our societies, our units and divisions, our economic privileges and socio-economic inequalities, our strong community bonds and, yes, our racism. Instead of trying to fully understand and, if necessary, change these relationships, some conveniently choose to ignore them altogether.

Statements such as “sport and politics must not mix” are not just wishful thinking – as they ignore the fundamental principle that sport is a direct expression of reality – they are also devious because they aim to distract from the fundamental issues that should concern everyone. .

This deceptive logic falls into the same category as the phrase “all lives matter” in response to the legitimate outcry for racial justice under the banner of “black lives matter”. The latter is intended to illustrate – in fact, challenge – racism and violence, which disproportionately target black people in the United States specifically because of their skin color; while the former, while technically accurate, is intended to deceive and undermine the urgency of dealing with systemic racism.

When American football player Colin Kaepernick knelt down in 2016 to protest racial injustice, he really wanted to bother, not to “dishonor” American “values” and “symbols,” but to force millions of people. people to step out of their comfort zone to face bigger issues than winning or losing a football match. His statement was an act of protest against the mistreatment of black communities across the United States. As a black man with access to media platforms, it was his moral duty to speak out. He did. But this entirely symbolic and non-violent act was seen by many in government, media and society as a betrayal, which ultimately cost the athlete his career.

The whole episode, which resonated around the world and the violent, often racist, reactions were political, unintentionally proving, once again, that the relationship between politics and human rights, d ‘on the one hand, and sport on the other hand, are impossible to separate. Interestingly, those who have insisted that Kaepernick violated the sanctity of the sport have no qualms about accepting other primarily political acts through football: the national anthem, the endless display of flags, nationalist chants, soldiers honored for their service in various wars and, at times, air force fighter jets flying above us, intoxicating the crowds with the might and might of the army American. Why is nationalist politics acceptable when a single black man kneeling down to shed light on the plight of innocent victims of police brutality is seen as an act of treason?

Whether practical or not, sport is full of political symbols and reflects existing realities: inequalities, racism, etc. It can also be a source of harmony and unity. In fact, sometimes it is, just like the heartwarming exchange between Portuguese international player Cristiano Ronaldo and Iranian footballer Ali Daei when, on June 24, Ronaldo tied Daei’s international goalscoring record. It can also be a reflection of entrenched socio-political ills, such as racism.

Racism is a political disease, like cancer cells that spread throughout the body, or the body politic in society. He must be stopped, on and off the pitch. While kneeling won’t end racism, it is meant to serve as a conversation starter, players’ moral stance, and a meaningful gesture of camaraderie and humanity.

– Ramzy Baroud is a journalist and editor-in-chief of The Palestine Chronicle. He is the author of five books. His latest is “These chains will be broken: Palestinian Stories of Struggle and Defiance in Israeli Prisons ”(Clarity Press). Dr Baroud is a non-resident principal investigator at the Center for Islam and Global Affairs (CIGA) and also at the Afro-Middle East Center (AMEC). Its website is www.ramzybaroud.net

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“Stillwater” review: “A subversion of the thriller tropes” https://mact-asso.org/stillwater-review-a-subversion-of-the-thriller-tropes/ Sat, 10 Jul 2021 21:52:24 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/stillwater-review-a-subversion-of-the-thriller-tropes/ Tom McCarthy, Oscar director Projector, marks its return to the awards season buzz with its new film Still water. Although marketed as a thriller, McCarthy incorporates several tones into a film that is meant to be incredibly character-driven. McCarthy hasn’t been one to stray from controversial topics in the past, and Still water is no […]]]>


Tom McCarthy, Oscar director Projector, marks its return to the awards season buzz with its new film Still water. Although marketed as a thriller, McCarthy incorporates several tones into a film that is meant to be incredibly character-driven.

McCarthy hasn’t been one to stray from controversial topics in the past, and Still water is no exception. The film follows Bill Baker (Matt Damon), a thug from Stillwater, Oklahoma, whose ex-daughter Allison (Abigail Breslin) has been wrongfully imprisoned in Marseille for five years for the murder of his ex-girlfriend. He visits her as often as he can, making the trip to France despite his financial situation.

However, that visit turns out to raise tensions with a new witness revelation that raises hopes of proving Allison’s innocence and absolving her from the remaining four-year sentence. This sends Baker in pursuit of the real killer in a desperate attempt to save his daughter. Along the way, the thug stubbornly navigates a society with which he lacks the ability to communicate.

Superficially, Still water looks like your typical Liam Neeson thriller that focuses on the mystery and the pursuit of the killer. And we can quite say that it is for the first act. However, McCarthy unexpectedly subverts this trope through the second act, ending and focusing on the more intimate development of the character. Baker’s search stops and he moves in with his new friend Virginie (Camille Cottin) and his lovely 9-year-old daughter Maya (Lilou Siauvaud). What happens next is an incredibly endearing character exploration sequence through the eyes of Bill Baker. We see him trying to redeem himself as a father figure to young Maya and learning to adapt to a new culture.

READ: “Benedetta” review: “A cynical and meaningless farce”

Damon looks stunning in his immersive performance as a Southern oil rig worker who fights for his family at all costs. His co-stars shine at his side, including Siauvaud. Indeed, Damon expressed at the press conference on Friday that the young actress was “the Meryl Streep of 9 years”. As a result, the character dynamics are incredibly natural. Despite the film’s exceptional cast, its tonal changes give the impression of suffering from awkward transitions. The score feels dated and off-putting for a modern film, heavily overwhelming the transition sequences with no real need.

Still water

By the end of the second act, the movie felt like it had suffered a whiplash. In some ways, it feels like there are several movies in one. Strangely enough, for those who have seen The secret in their eyes, you will notice a strong inspiration from one of his pivotal scenes in Still waterthe third act. Fortunately, there is a satisfying if bittersweet conclusion to the story of not only how a man from Oklahoma fares in French society, but also how the rest of the world views Americans. over the past five years.

Overall, Still water stands as another Oscar nominee for McCarthy’s filmography. Damon will likely get his next nomination and maybe even win as Bill Baker. It would not be undeserved. – Ileana Melendez

Note: 7.5 / 10

Still water hits theaters on July 30, 2021.

The film stars Matt Damon, Abigail Breslin, Camille Cottin and Lilou Siauvaud.






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Adele Exarchopoulos says “I have no regrets” – The Hollywood Reporter https://mact-asso.org/adele-exarchopoulos-says-i-have-no-regrets-the-hollywood-reporter/ Sat, 10 Jul 2021 03:01:24 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/adele-exarchopoulos-says-i-have-no-regrets-the-hollywood-reporter/ It has been barely eight years since Adèle Exarchopoulos became the cinematographic revelation of the Cannes Film Festival. The French actress not only enjoyed her major breakout moment on the Croisette with 2013 Blue is the warmest color, Abdellatif Kechiche’s lesbian romance, acclaimed by critics, but made history by becoming the first actress to win […]]]>


It has been barely eight years since Adèle Exarchopoulos became the cinematographic revelation of the Cannes Film Festival. The French actress not only enjoyed her major breakout moment on the Croisette with 2013 Blue is the warmest color, Abdellatif Kechiche’s lesbian romance, acclaimed by critics, but made history by becoming the first actress to win the Palme d’Or – alongside her co-star Lea Seydoux – and, at just 19 years old at the time, its youngest recipient.

Less than a decade later and several visits to Cannes later, Exarchopoulos – now 27 – is back, this time with two films. At Julie Lecoustre and Emmanuel Marre zero fuck given – appearing in the Critics’ Week sidebar – she takes on the role of a party stewardess working for a low-cost European airline and struggling with her own sense of identity and purpose as she pulls herself together travels from one destination to another.

Out of competition and acquired by Netflix during Cannes, she is also part of an ensemble cast in Cédric Jimenez’s thriller The fortress, set in the crime-soaked streets outside Marseille and following the infamous BAC police squad, which is deploying morally questionable tactics to improve drug seizure statistics.

Talk to Hollywood journalist, Exarchopoulos reflects on his relationship with Cannes and how it was “the start of it all,” but considers the good times and the bad (Sean Penn’s The last face), the career path she followed after her explosive escape in Blue is the Warmest Color and explains why Thierry Fremaux might not want to hear what happened to his Palme d’Or statuette.

You return to the festival where you made your major breakthrough, won the Palme d’Or and have been there several times since. Does Cannes hold a special place in your heart?

Yes, I have strong memories of Cannes. But the funny thing is that for Blue is the warmest color, I didn’t really realize what was going on. I didn’t know about the commercial, I didn’t know what was significant and what wasn’t, so it was all pretty exciting. I didn’t even know we each had a Palme d’Or! I remember around 4 in the morning after a party with my friends, one of them said to me: “Wow, did you know that this is the first time and probably the last time that the Palme goes to a actor ”, and I said to myself no! So for me Cannes is really the beginning of everything, but at the same time I had both experiences in Cannes. I went there with Blue is the warmest color and it was a huge success, and everyone was like ‘oh this is amazing’ and then i went with the Sean Penn movie (The last face) and it was really hard. Cannes can really destroy or build you up. There is obviously good constructive criticism, but then there is often [some] that seems pretty unfair. There is a lot of noise !

Where is the Palm now?

Ooh la la, I hope Thierry Fremaux never sees this interview. So we got our awards a year later because they had to build them, and I was so happy we had a special party. The Palm comes on this plinth, to support it and I was so excited that… I broke it. I didn’t glue it back on, I just tried to hold it in place. Anyway, it’s now with my parents. But to be honest, I love the story more than the statue.

zero fuck given – great title aside – is a truly interesting film that opens a fascinating window into the lonely world of the budget flight attendant. What drew you to the role?

I have already watched the directors’ short films, they were in the same style with a real documentary side, natural. And he [Marre] told me he didn’t have a script at the time – he just wanted to talk about loneliness and how you find your life purpose. He said it was going to be a very small crew, that we actually didn’t have any permission to shoot on planes so we would make a deal where everyone on board would agree to be filmed but could travel for free. And he was like, wanna come with me?

I understood that you were the only professional actor in the film …

It was just me and my sister. And my father is the distributor of the film! But yes, everyone is their own real character. The airlines knew this and they chose flight attendants. It was truly an experience. Sometimes there were scenes shot on an iPhone. Honestly, it was really crazy and it feels so much like a documentary. There was no makeup department – I did my own. It meant it was really hard not to get lost in the character.

Has it changed your attitude towards people in these kinds of jobs, when you see the mundane repetition?

To be honest, playing a flight attendant for a low-cost airline made me realize the difficult pace and the fact that when you’re in the air you can’t really do anything related. to his life. For example, we were about to take off and I got a message from my son’s school about a problem, and I was trying to deal with it, but we had to take off and I couldn’t do anything do for several hours. It’s very difficult. There is also this image of the flight attendants, you see where they stay in each country with their teams in the hotels, see the world, but at the same time you are always far from home and cannot tie real relationships.

The fortress is a very different film, a thriller set in the crime-ravaged streets outside of Marseille. What attracted you to this kind of film?

It’s a mainstream movie, but what I really liked was the way it shows people on both sides – including people who live in this tough neighborhood – just trying to get out of it. You also see the bosses of these drug trafficking organizations and these are the people who wear the costumes. They are never the ones who will have problems. He showed that those who still suffer are the families. It really is a good mirror of society – showing what happens when hard right-wing politics are forced on people.

You’ve had a real mix of movies since Blue is the warmest color. Was there a particular career path that you chose to follow when selecting your projects?

If I remember correctly, I was very young so I didn’t try to have a strategy. I remember getting a lot of offers and I think what I’m really proud of is being honest with myself. I thought, of course, that people might believe I can do anything now, but I know I can’t because I still have things to learn. I won’t say which ones of course, but there are films that I made of which I was not particularly proud and of which I regretted elements. But I still really remember why I made them. And it was either for human interaction or to work with a director or for a character. But I think the choices you make reveal who you are, and can also be quite political, even if it’s not consciously. I just tried to follow my instincts and so far I have no regrets. It must have been difficult to have such a breakthrough and then manage the number of offers, trying to figure out what the best direction would be. What was hard was that I traveled for a year with Blue is the warmest color, and that was really cool – I discovered a lot of things, learned a lot about myself and stood up for the movie, and then when I came back to reality I had to make those choices. And that was the way people looked at you and tried to make you into something – like, oh, that would be nice if you lost weight, or if you did that. One day I was like okay, I don’t want to be like those people who feel lonely because they shoot movie after movie, and I don’t want to be what people project on me. I really wanted to keep my freedom. So it was difficult, but luckily all the people around like my family are not from the industry and don’t really care. So there was always a feeling of luck and fun – like wow, I’m gonna work with Sean Penn or oh la la, I’m gonna work with Ralph Fiennes! I have never been bored.

Interview edited for length and clarity.



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Anti-racist solidarity during Euro 2020 should not be ‘controversial’ – Middle East Monitor https://mact-asso.org/anti-racist-solidarity-during-euro-2020-should-not-be-controversial-middle-east-monitor/ Thu, 08 Jul 2021 09:09:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/anti-racist-solidarity-during-euro-2020-should-not-be-controversial-middle-east-monitor/ Another football “controversy” arose when footballers in the current UEFA Euro 2020 tournament knelt before kick-off to protest racism, a serious problem plaguing football stadiums since many years. While some teams and players have chosen to kneel, others have chosen not to. Spurious excuses such as “the players weren’t ready” and “politics should stay out […]]]>


Another football “controversy” arose when footballers in the current UEFA Euro 2020 tournament knelt before kick-off to protest racism, a serious problem plaguing football stadiums since many years. While some teams and players have chosen to kneel, others have chosen not to. Spurious excuses such as “the players weren’t ready” and “politics should stay out of football” have been put forward.

Racism in sport is a very real problem, although it cannot be separated from racism in society in general. In fact, reactions to the principled position taken by many actors themselves reflected the way in which right-wing, populist and chauvinist political movements exert massive influence across Europe, as these movements often define the dominant political sensitivities. Politics is therefore already present in football, and “kneeling” is a reaction to negative political manifestations affecting the sport.

For example, the French national team has a number of top players, mostly black and Muslim. They were attacked by right-wing politicians and media to the point that on June 15 the whole squad decided not to kneel at the start of their matches, due to the possibility of racist repercussions.

In this example, racism in sport won out over anti-racist solidarity. Moreover, the country’s highest football authority, the French Football Federation (FFF), does not even recognize the need to discuss the issue. FFF president Noel Le Graet is said to have said that racism “does not exist”, following an incident last September during the Marseille-Paris Saint Germain match, when Brazilian PSG player Neymar was called “monkey motherf **** r” during a fight.

READ: Words alone won’t end anti-Muslim terrorism in Canada

Not only are racist incidents at football matches on the increase and well documented in France and elsewhere, but the “monkey” insult is particularly popular among European football fans who, sometimes in groups, perform “monkey songs. “targeting black players. When such a despicable practice finally gained national attention in Italy, a court dismissed the case as “unfounded”, and fans who were caught “singing monkeys” on camera were ” acquitted unconditionally “.

It is therefore unfortunate that only half of the Italian squad knelt before their game against Wales on June 20 and then decided not to kneel at all in a subsequent game. It is telling that while racism in sport continues to prevail, anti-racist solidarity is seen as unnecessary and divisive.

Romelu Lukaku of Belgium takes a knee to support the Black Lives Matter movement ahead of the UEFA Euro 2020 Championship quarter-final match between Belgium and Italy at Football Arena Munich on July 2, 2021 in Munich, Germany. [Matthias Hangst/Getty Images]

The truth is that football, like any other sport, is a reflection of our societies; our unity and divisions; our economic privileges and socio-economic inequalities; our strong community ties; and, yes, our racism. Instead of trying to fully understand and, if necessary, change these relationships, some simply choose to ignore them altogether.

Claims that “sport and politics should not mix” are not just wishful thinking – they ignore the fundamental principle that sport is a direct expression of reality – but are also a devious way to hijack the attention to fundamental issues that should concern everyone. We heard the same during the apartheid era in South Africa, and we hear the same today against efforts to get athletes, as well as artists, to boycott the apartheid state. Israel, a country which, moreover, is a member of UEFA and participates in its tournaments.

This deceptive logic falls into the same category as “All Lives Matter”, a response to the legitimate outcry for racial justice under the banner “Black Lives Matter”. The latter is intended to illustrate – in fact, challenge – racism and violence, which disproportionately target black people in the United States specifically because of their skin color. The first, while quite accurate, is intended to deceive and undermine the urgency to tackle systemic racism in society and its institutions.

READ: How Europe supports Israel

When American football player Colin Kaepernick knelt in 2016 during the national anthem before a game to protest racial injustice, he wanted to be disruptive. It was not a question of “dishonoring” American “values” and “symbols”, but of forcing millions of people out of their comfort zone to face issues far greater than winning or losing a game. of football. His statement was a highly visible act of protest against the mistreatment of black communities across the United States. As a black man with access to media platforms, it was his moral duty to speak out, and he did. But this entirely symbolic and non-violent act was seen by many in government, media and society as a betrayal, which ultimately cost the professional athlete his career.

The entire episode reverberated around the world and the violent, often racist, reactions were all politically motivated, proving – albeit unconsciously, no doubt – that the relationship between politics and human rights man on the one hand, and sport on the other, is impossible to avoid. Interestingly, those who insist that Kaepernick and those who followed his example violate the sanctity of sport have no qualms that other primarily political acts are tied to sporting rituals, such as national anthems. , flags and nationalist songs. In the United States, Soldiers are honored before matches for their service in various wars, and occasionally Air Force jets fly overhead, intoxicating onlookers with the might and might of the United States Army. Why are such political acts apparently acceptable at sporting events, but a single black man kneeling down to shed light on the plight of innocent victims of police brutality is seen as an act of treason?

Sport can, of course, be a source of harmony and unity. Evidenced by the heartwarming exchange between Portuguese footballer Cristiano Ronaldo and Iranian Ali Daei when, on June 24, Ronaldo equaled the international goalscoring record held by the Iranian player. Sadly, sport is also teeming with political symbolism and reflections of deep-rooted socio-political ills.

Racism is a political disease, like cancer in society. He must be stopped, on and off the pitch. While kneeling will not end racism, this act of solidarity should serve as the start of a conversation; a principled position of the players which should be applauded, not condemned as a “controversial” act.

The opinions expressed in this article are the property of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial policy of Middle East Monitor.



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