Marseille Society – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ Fri, 20 May 2022 10:15:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mact-asso.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default-150x150.png Marseille Society – Mact Asso http://mact-asso.org/ 32 32 In Paris, Green Forum traces a more sustainable footprint for the planet https://mact-asso.org/in-paris-green-forum-traces-a-more-sustainable-footprint-for-the-planet/ Fri, 20 May 2022 10:15:09 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/in-paris-green-forum-traces-a-more-sustainable-footprint-for-the-planet/ PARIS – People suffering from eco-anxiety – the fear of environmental catastrophe – could get a boost from a green forum in Paris this week. Bringing together hundreds of eco-entrepreneurs, businesses and activists, ChangeNOW aims to chart a sustainable plan for the future. From trendy food, tech to transportation, a slew of green solutions for […]]]>

People suffering from eco-anxiety – the fear of environmental catastrophe – could get a boost from a green forum in Paris this week. Bringing together hundreds of eco-entrepreneurs, businesses and activists, ChangeNOW aims to chart a sustainable plan for the future.

From trendy food, tech to transportation, a slew of green solutions for our resource-hungry society are parked until Saturday at a huge event venue – made of sustainable materials – in the shade of the Eiffel Tower.

Louise Chopinet of the French startup Windcoop, Paris, May 19, 2022.

“It takes 35 days to reach Madagascar from Marseille. Passing through the Suez Canal. And we use the wind. This helps us save up to 60% energy,” says Louise Chopinet, who runs a Brittany-based shipping startup called Windcoop. Its wind-propelled sailboats carry approximately 14,000 tons of cargo per trip. For now, that means spices from farmers in Madagascar. As the shipping industry is challenged to become carbon neutral by 2050, sailing is taking off.

“It’s really a growing interest now. Everyone gets under sail and into the wind,” she noted.

Berlin-based Noa Climate also works in Africa. It sells systems that recycle organic waste into energy in locations far from power grids. Janine Gadke, from Noa, explains that the company works with financial partners so that poor communities can buy products on credit.

“In Kenya we have a project in an orphanage, they have a system there…they can have electricity and everything. And they feed the system with kitchen scraps,” Gadke said.

ChangeNOW is considered one of the biggest global environmental events of the year. This 5th edition includes CEOs and activist celebrities, such as British primatologist Jane Goodall.

The luxury brand LVMH at the green forum in Paris, May 19, 2022.

The luxury brand LVMH at the green forum in Paris, May 19, 2022.

Being Paris, representatives of a greener fashion industry are also present, such as the luxury group LVMH. Companies also offer natural textiles such as silk, cotton, hemp and mohair.

Eva Pujol of the green textile group The Sustainable Angle, Paris, May 19, 2022.

Eva Pujol of the green textile group The Sustainable Angle, Paris, May 19, 2022.

“We can sense a boom in demand,” says Eva Pujol who works for UK textile association The Sustainable Angle; adding that “more and more people are coming and we have brands that are asking for more and more sustainable materials…I think the pressure is mostly coming from customers to buy better.”

The forum offers bike parking, recyclable bins and a veggie burger stand. Those who haven’t found climate-friendly transportation to come here can help offset their carbon emissions.

Cooing veggie burgers and hot dogs, Paris, <a class=France, May 19, 2022.” src=”https://gdb.voanews.com/03180000-0aff-0242-1b28-08da39c02bcf_w250_r0_s.jpg”/>

Cooing veggie burgers and hot dogs, Paris, France, May 19, 2022.
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Top 10 small towns in France for memorable summer vacations https://mact-asso.org/top-10-small-towns-in-france-for-memorable-summer-vacations/ Mon, 16 May 2022 10:07:24 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/top-10-small-towns-in-france-for-memorable-summer-vacations/ The most visited country in the world, France is an undisputed jewel of Europe, home to centuries of history, culture, fine cuisine, music, fashion and unforgettable natural wonders. While its capital Paris is renowned the world over, the small towns of France have their own beauty and charm that will surely satisfy any visitor. From […]]]>

The most visited country in the world, France is an undisputed jewel of Europe, home to centuries of history, culture, fine cuisine, music, fashion and unforgettable natural wonders. While its capital Paris is renowned the world over, the small towns of France have their own beauty and charm that will surely satisfy any visitor. From stunning hillside views, majestic examples of human architecture and an abundance of the best of local French cuisine, France’s small towns offer everyone a unique and beautiful experience of France. This article takes a look at the ten small towns in France to visit for a memorable summer vacation.

Bayeux

Cathedral of Our Lady of Bayeux in the Calvados department of Normandy, Bayeux, France. Editorial credit: Roman Babakin / Shutterstock.com

Well known for the Bayeux Tapestry, an embroidered medieval cloth from 1066, Bayeux is a beautiful town in the famous Normandy region. Due to its geographical location, during the Second World War, it was among the first French cities liberated by the Allied forces in 1944, and today offers its inhabitants and visitors a mixture of ancient and modern history. Tourists will marvel at Bayeux Cathedral (consecrated in 1077), which dominates the local skyline while a visit to the Jardin Botanique de Bayeux (a 3-hectare botanical space) created in the 1860s gives any passer-by an atmospheric serene. On the way there, a stop at the military cemetery in Bayeux will provide a moving experience for everyone, with nearly 5,000 burials. The cemetery poignantly honors the memory of all those who lost the cruelty of war.

Hunspach

Alsatian traditional white half-timbered houses in the village of Hunspach, Alsace, France
Alsatian traditional white half-timbered houses in the village of Hunspach, Alsace, France. Editorial credit: S. Moebs / Shutterstock.com

Elected like France “favorite village” in the television program Favorite village of the French, Hunspach is a pretty little town in the Alsace region, near the country’s border with Germany. Famous for its wooden houses lined with flower boxes, this village may have a population of just 632 but is filled with picturesque postcard images. Mix leisurely strolls through its main streets, friendly locals and an excellent selection of tavernas and restaurants, and any stay in Hunspach is sure to be the highlight of a road trip through France.

Cassis

Sunset time in the port of Cassis, France
Sunset time in the port of Cassis, France.

Just a 30 minute drive from France’s second largest city, Marseille, Cassis is a small coastal town on the famous French Riviera. Although often overlooked by other similar destinations like Saint-Tropez and Nice, Cassis offers the same beauty with a noticeably quieter atmosphere. A beautiful fishing port surrounded by pebble beaches and steep limestone cliffs, the views in Cassis are second to none. Add to that beautifully colored buildings, a great selection of restaurants and cafes and, of course, the warm Mediterranean sunshine, Cassis is the perfect place to enjoy the South of France in a less crowded centre. And of course, no visitor will want to miss a glass of the famous Cassis wine!

Eguisheim

Square with colorful traditional French houses and fountain with statue of Pope Leo IX in Eguisheim, France
Square with colorful traditional French houses and a fountain with a statue of Pope Leo IX in Eguisheim, France. Editorial credit: Olgysha / Shutterstock.com

Another small village near the German border, when visiting Eguisheim tourists will experience a vivid taste of medieval history. Filled with narrow cobbled streets, wooden houses and stone buildings, all with roots in the Middle Ages, Eguisheim is a most fascinating pit stop for those in the Grand Est region. The town is also famous for being a stage on the famous Alsace Wine Route, a long road of about 170 kilometers which crosses the main wine vineyards of the region. But when they’re not marveling at medieval history or savoring premium wine, visitors can also take advantage of an assortment of hiking and biking trails around the town, which include sights such as Château Hagueneck and Pflixbourg.

The Baux de Provence

Village of Les Baux-de-Provence, France
Village of Les Baux de Provence, France.

Located in the Alpilles of southern France, Les Baux-de-Provence has often been called one of the most beautiful villages in the country. It sees more than a million visitors go through it each year, even if the permanent population is just under 400 inhabitants! But it’s not hard to see why so many flock to this common; Stunning fields filled with lavender are a staple of the summer months, while several vineyards and olive oil producers call the town home. Les Baux-de-Provence is definitely the place to be for some of the best local French cuisine delights. Meanwhile, art lovers will surely enjoy the Carrières de Lumières, a former quarry that now houses a variety of works of art projected onto the walls of underground caves! Add some beautiful French music in the background and it’s a truly fantastic experience.

Chamonix

Street view of Chamonix town in French Alps, France
Street view of Chamonix town in the French Alps, France. Editorial credit: Nataliya Nazarova / Shutterstock.com

The site of the first Winter Olympics, Chamonix (or Chamonix Mont Blanc), is famous for having one of the best ski areas in Europe. Located immediately north of Mont Blanc, the highest peak in the Alps, the town of Chamonix is ​​also a stone’s throw from the Italian and Swiss borders, making day trips to these countries one of the most popular excursions. Non-skiing visitors, however, will be able to take in all the alpine beauty of the area, especially with a cable car ride. Take a ride to the top of the Aiguille du Midi at nearly 4,000 meters above sea level for views of the mountains and valleys that will create incredible memories and photos!

vogue

Vogue, France
The historic town of Vogue, dramatically located in a gorge of the Ardèche River, is one of the most beautiful villages in France and a popular travel destination in the Ardèche region.

Located on the banks of the Ardèche, Vogue has barely 1,100 inhabitants, but its small size is deceptive. A quaint village that features a medieval castle, wooden buildings, cobbled streets and, of course, charming little cafes and bars, Vogue lives up to its fashionable name! Surrounded by exquisite limestone cliffs that seem to rise out of the water, the town is also next to the Parque Natural Regional de Los Montes de Ardeche. A beautiful nature reserve with hiking trails, rolling pastures and on-site accommodation, a stay in this small French village will not disappoint.

Island of Porquerolles

View of the marina of the island of Porquerolles from Fort Sainte Agathe in France
View of the marina of Porquerolles island from Fort Sainte Agathe in France.

The largest of the four Hyères islands off the coast of southern France, the island of Porquerolles, is a short ferry ride from the city of Toulon. Stunning views, clear waters, sandy beaches and warm sunshine make it a very popular destination for visitors to the French Riviera. Host to an annual summer jazz festival, much of the island is part of Port-Cros National Park, which provides protection for the French state from overdevelopment. Some 500 acres of vineyards exist on the island, which was first planted in 1912, allowing visitors to once again taste the famous southern French wine in a beautiful setting.

Arcachon

Aerial view of the Arcachon seaside.
Aerial view of the Arcachon seaside.

An hour’s drive from the city of Bordeaux, Arcachon is located inside the basin of the same name on the Atlantic Ocean. Its mild climate has long been sought after by people with lung ailments, and the sandy beaches and ocean breezes make it a most enjoyable excursion. Arcachon is also known for its local oysters, which make for great seafood in the town’s main square. While enjoying this excellent cuisine, any tourist can also relax and admire the view of attractive 19th century buildings and villas, a seaside promenade and an assortment of local artists and artisans. A glass of Bordeaux wine is sure to top off any visit to this charming coastal town.

Biarritz

Sunset view of the marina of Biarritz, France
Sunset view over the marina of Biarritz, France.

One of France’s most popular seaside resorts, Biarritz, is centered on the Bay of Biscay, just 35km from the Spanish border. Once a small fishing port, Biarritz became a popular summer retreat after Emperor Napoleon III built a lavish villa (Hotel du Palais) there in the 1850s. Biarritz was a hotspot for European royalty throughout throughout the 19th and 20th centuries and up to the present day, while gradually becoming a place of exciting nightlife, cuisine and art. Casinos, world-class surfing beaches and an array of museums celebrating local history, Biarritz is a true vacation wonder. Warm sunshine, breathtaking ocean views and a sea of ​​culture will surround any visitor who comes to the shores of Biarritz, no matter how long they stay.

France is one of the most culturally rich nations in Europe, matched only by geographic vastness and natural wonders. Although its main cities continue to attract the majority of visitors, a trip through the country’s smaller towns reveals a charming side to French society and history that can be easily overlooked in large urban centers.

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Mid-Shore Calendar | Calendar | stardem.com https://mact-asso.org/mid-shore-calendar-calendar-stardem-com/ Fri, 13 May 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/mid-shore-calendar-calendar-stardem-com/ PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org. THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. […]]]>

PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org.

THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital in Easton. Info and updates: 410-822-2031 or Facebook at Shore Regional Health.

Flower Show, 1-4 p.m., at the Preston Historical Society Museum, 167 Main St., Preston, sponsored by the Caroline County Garden Club. Information: 410-924-9080.

Steamed Shrimp or Crawfish Dinner, 5-7 p.m., American Legion Post 296, 6200 Main St., Queenstown. Dial 410-827-8182.

FRIDAY NIGHT DINNER, 5-7 p.m., American Legion Post 29, 9238 Legion Road, Denton. Fish and/or Shrimp, $8 or $12. Entertainment 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Alan Cheezum (guitar). Info: 410-479-2708.

Nature Mythbusters, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Pickering Creek Audubon Center, $5 per person. Does moss really only grow on the north side of trees? Can you get warts from touching toads? If you’ve ever wondered about some of these and other bizarre nature myths, legends, and truths, join the educators of Pickering Creek on this guided walk. Register at https://pickeringcreek.org/programs/upcoming-programs/.

MUSICAL, 7 p.m., North Carolina High School Drama Club performs “The Sound of Music” in the school auditorium.

Volunteer Day: Caterpillar Counts, 9-11:30 a.m., Pickering Creek Audubon Center. Prior registration required. “Caterpillars matter! is a citizen science project to measure seasonal variation, also known as phenology, and the abundance of arthropods like caterpillars, beetles, and spiders. Volunteers will survey and count insects on specific trees and shrubs at designated survey sites. Group leaders will provide all necessary materials and guide volunteers through survey procedures.

THRIFT STORE & FOOD PANTRY, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 29533 Canvasback Drive, Easton. Opening hours: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., pantry; Thrift store from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. offering used clothing, a boutique, household items and furniture. Donations are accepted from noon to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Info: 410-770-4505 or www.svdpeastonmd.org.

ST. VINCENT ADVISORS, Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, 29533 Canvasback Drive, Easton. Saturday Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Providing financial assistance to families in Talbot County.

TALBOT BIRD CLUB, Dorchester County Annual Spring Count. Contact Harry Armisted 215-913-4785 or harryarmistead@hotmail.com if you are interested in participating.

MUSEUM OF RURAL LIFE/CAROLINA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 16N. Second St., Denton, open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artifacts and memorabilia on display. FREE ENTRANCE. Info: 410-479-2055 or www.carolinehistory.org.

MUSICAL, 5 p.m., North Carolina High School Drama Club performs “The Sound of Music” in the school auditorium.

CARS AND CAFE, 8-11 a.m., Easton VFW, 355 Glebe Rd., Easton. Dust off those classics, hot rods, custom, etc. and come and spend some time enjoying the automotive hobby. Spectators are always welcome. Free entry for all. Held on the first and third Sunday of each month until November 6, 2022.

SUNDAY BREAKFAST, 8-11 a.m., American Legion Post 29, 9238 Legion Road, Denton. Cost: $9. Info: 410-479-2708.

TALBOT BIRD CLUB, Talbot County Annual Spring Count. Contact Ron Ketter 707-373-5532 or rgketter@gmail.com if you are interested in participating.

MEMBERS’ MEETING, Preston Historical Society, 167 Main Street, Preston. 7:00 pm Guest speaker Bud Marseille will give a presentation on oyster farming. Open to the public. Info: www.prestonhistoricalsociety.com or call 410-924-9080.

PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org.

THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital in Easton. Info and updates: 410-822-2031 or Facebook at Shore Regional Health.

ZOOM STEADY & STRONG, Oxford Community Centre, 200 Oxford Road. 10:15 a.m. A 45-minute class for adults looking for better abdominal and muscular strength and better balance. Directed by Janet Pfeffer. $8 per class, $60 for 10 classes. Pre-registration required. For further information: 410-226-5904, oxfordcc@verizon.net or www.oxfordcc.org.

LEGION GRILL, American Legion Talbot Post 70, 29511 Canvasback Drive, Easton. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday noon and evening. Tuesday night special from 3 to 7 p.m. Wings for 75 cents and draft beer for $1. Open to the public. Eat in or take away; mandatory masks. Information: 410-822-9138.

FOOD PANTRY, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 29533 Canvasback Drive, Easton. 1 to 4 p.m. Info: 410 770-4505 or www.svdpeastonmd.org.

ST. VINCENT ADVISORS, Society of Saint Vincent de Paul, 29533 Canvasback Drive, Easton. Tuesday hours: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Provide financial assistance to families in Talbot County.

TUESDAY NIGHT BINGO, Denton American Legion Post 29, 9238 Legion Road, Denton. 7:30 p.m. Snack break, computers available. Info: 410-479-2708.

PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org.

THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital in Easton. Info and updates: 410-822-2031 or Facebook at Shore Regional Health.

LEGION GRILL, American Legion Talbot Post 70, 29511 Canvasback Drive, Easton. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday noon and evening. Special Wednesday evening 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Fried chicken 4 pieces & 2 side dishes $10. Open to the public. Eat in or take away; mandatory masks. Information: 410-822-9138.

Nature Walk: Wetlands and Grasslands, 9-10:30 a.m., Pickering Creek Audubon Center, $5 per person. Join director Mark Scallion for a walk through the center.

PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org.

THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital in Easton. Info and updates: 410-822-2031 or Facebook at Shore Regional Health.

ZOOM STEADY & STRONG, Oxford Community Centre, 200 Oxford Road. 10:15 a.m. A 45-minute class for adults looking for better abdominal and muscular strength and better balance. Directed by Janet Pfeffer. $8 per class, $60 for 10 classes. Pre-registration required. For further information: 410-226-5904, oxfordcc@verizon.net or www.oxfordcc.org.

LEGION GRILL, American Legion Talbot Post 70, 29511 Canvasback Drive, Easton. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday noon and evening. Thursday night special 3 to 7 p.m. Half pound steamed shrimp and 2 sides $10.75. Open to the public. Eat in or take away; mandatory masks. Information: 410-822-9138.

THRIFT STORE, Society of St. Vincent de Paul, 29533 Canvasback Drive, Easton. 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Housewares, shop, gently used clothing and furniture. Info: 410-770-4505 or www.svdpeastonmd.org.

KENT ISLAND FARMERS MARKET, car park next to Cult Classic Brewing Company, 1169 Shopping Center Road, Stevensville. 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursday. Over 15 vendors including fresh produce, dairy, meat, wine, spirits, breads, seafood, CBD, food trucks and more. Free gardening workshop. Live music. Info: www.facebook.com/Kentislandfarmersmarket/.

Taco Dinner, 5-7 p.m., American Legion Post 296, 6200 Main St., Queenstown. Dial 410-827-8182.

EASTON HISTORICAL GUIDED TOUR, 11 a.m. Walking tours depart from outside the Talbot Historical Society; meet at 25 S. Washington Street. Reservations required. Call 410-822-1287 or email collections@talbothistory.org.

EASTON HISTORIC ARCHITECTURE TOUR, noon. Walking tours depart from outside the Talbot Historical Society; meet at 25 S. Washington Street. Reservations required. Call 410-822-1287 or email collections@talbothistory.org.

PANTRY, Martin’s House & Barn, 14374 Benedictine Lane, Ridgely. Drive-thru hours: 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Please wear a mask and stay in the car. Food Assistance: 410-634-2537 ext. 111. Info: www.martinshouseandbarn.org.

THRIFT & CONSIGNMENT SHOP, The Bazaar at 121 Federal St., Easton. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Friday. Sponsored by the Auxiliary of Memorial Hospital in Easton. Info and updates: 410-822-2031 or Facebook at Shore Regional Health.

Fried Chicken Dinner, 5-7 p.m., American Legion Post 296, 6200 Main St., Queenstown. Dial 410-827-8182.

FRIDAY NIGHT DINNER, 5-7 p.m., American Legion Post 29, 9238 Legion Road, Denton. SAL serving hamburger dinner, $8. Entertainment: Garrett Roe, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Info: 410 479-2708.

OXFORD FINE ARTS PREVIEW GALA, Oxford Community Centre, 200 Oxford Road. 6:00 pm See the art first, meet the artists, enjoy hors d’oeuvres and drinks. Tickets available online at oxfordcc.org.

OXFORD FINE ARTS EXHIBITION AND SALE, Oxford Community Centre, 200 Oxford Road. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets available at the door, oxfordcc.org. Saturday night enjoy music in the tent with BBQ available for purchase.

MUSEUM OF RURAL LIFE/CAROLINA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 16N. Second St., Denton, open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artifacts and memorabilia on display. FREE ENTRANCE. Info: 410-479-2055 or www.carolinehistory.org.

SOUP AND WALK, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Adkins Arboretum. Subject: Beavers, Tuckahoe Creek and beyond. Plants of interest include mountain laurel, beech, tulip tree, lady’s slipper, Solomon’s seal and may apple. On the menu: minestrone, oven-roasted red beets and carrots, brown rice bread with raspberry jam, crunchy cinnamon apple cake. Cost: $25 for members and $30 for non-members. Prior registration is required. Visit adkinsarboretum.org or call 410-634-2847, ext. 0.

OXFORD FINE ARTS EXHIBITION AND SALE, Oxford Community Centre, 200 Oxford Road. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets available at the door, oxfordcc.org.

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“It took a lot of work this season to get this opportunity” https://mact-asso.org/it-took-a-lot-of-work-this-season-to-get-this-opportunity/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:46:36 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/it-took-a-lot-of-work-this-season-to-get-this-opportunity/ So far this season, Josh Bassett has made 25 appearances for Wasps in all competitions ©David Howlett It took Alfie Barbeary’s try with three minutes remaining in Edinburgh to send Wasps into the Challenge Cup semi-final against Lyon. It was a game largely won by the brutality of Lee Blackett’s forwards, with Barbeary one of […]]]>

So far this season, Josh Bassett has made 25 appearances for Wasps in all competitions

©David Howlett

It took Alfie Barbeary’s try with three minutes remaining in Edinburgh to send Wasps into the Challenge Cup semi-final against Lyon.

It was a game largely won by the brutality of Lee Blackett’s forwards, with Barbeary one of three strikers to come from the pack alongside Biyi Alo and Tom West, while the ever-green Jimmy Gopperth was the exception to the rule .

Mike Blair’s Edinburgh had lost just once at home all season before the English knocked on the door at DAM Health Stadium. The hosts started the brightest, with former Wasp Ben Vellacott scoring the first try after the two sides traded penalties to start the proceedings.

Although it was not a trial weekend for Josh Bassett, the 30-year-old winger still scored 80 minutes for his club. Currently in his ninth season with the Wasps, the former Bedford Blues man was enthusiastic about his teammates’ efforts last Saturday afternoon.

“They like to throw the ball around a bit, they showed that and we probably didn’t take the opportunities we needed with the pressure we put on them in the first half,” he told TRUE.

“I think the peloton did extremely well in the scrum and put us in those positions. They continued to do that in the second half, and we were able to stick to the game plan a bit more and take a few more opportunities and put pressure on the scoreboard.

“As is always the case in big games, the momentum comes and goes, and I thought that was the case towards the end. I think we showed real resilience to hold on and picking up a big win against an in-form club and a club that had only lost once all year at home.

Since first donning a black and amber shirt, Bassett has reached six semi-finals with Wasps – four of them in the Premiership – and that was in 2014 when the club were last at this stage of the Challenge Cup , losing to Bath 24-18 at Adams Park.

Reaching this stage of the Challenge Cup this season comes after a difficult start to the 2021/22 campaign where the playing squad was reduced to 25 in-form players with key operators Malaki Fekitoa, Joe Launchbury, Jack Willis and Dan Robson all having had spells on the sidelines.

Josh Bassett joined Wasps ahead of the 2013/14 season

©David Howlett

There was even a time when Blackett had no loose props in shape at the club, Ben Harris and Tom West both out of action at the same time, with Gordon Reid recruited at short notice.

Despite all those initial setbacks, the Coventry-based club are only 80 minutes away from a European final in Marseille and with three games to go in the Gallagher Premiership season they have a mathematical chance of progressing to the play-offs. .

Late-season form was also buoyed by a reshuffle of the coaching staff, with John Mitchell taking charge of defense and Matt Everard swapping with the New Zealander to lead the attack. The adjustments in the back room have helped the Wasps to six wins in their last seven games.

The only game in which the Midlands side failed to triumph was the club’s last Premiership outing which saw them draw 42 with London Irish at Brentford Community Stadium.

“At the beginning we were very unhappy with an injury, like all teams,” Bassett said. “Being down to 25 fit players for training certainly makes it difficult for everyone, and you throw Covid situations into that.

“All the clubs have been through different things. The best thing we’ve done is show resilience to come back from that and then build on what we did at the start of the season.

“Obviously if the London Irish game had ended the way we would have liked it would have strengthened our position in the league, but every minute game is knockout rugby for us, even in the league. .

“Every game is as important as the last. That’s where you want to be as a rugby player. We would have liked to have done that a bit better earlier in the season, to put ourselves in a better position in the league, but we’re really proud of what we’ve built on and the milestones we’re reaching.

A recent report from CoventryLive revealed that the potential departure of James Gaskell will mean Bassett, Joe Launchbury and Rob Miller will be the three remaining players at Wasps since the club moved to the Coventry Building Society Arena in the summer of 2014.

In that time the club have reached two Premiership finals and last summer they opened their new state-of-the-art £4million training center at Henley-in-Arden. For the seven years leading up to this move, Broadstreet RFC’s Ivor Preece Field was the team’s daily home.

“We’ve always been nomads, even in London,” Bassett said. “Moving to the West Midlands, going to Broadstreet, which we knew was temporary, but now we finally have a base and a home and what a home it is.

“It’s such a big facility. There are so many plans to make it even better. We are so lucky. The main thing for me is that Wasps have something of their own to put down roots and allow the club to grow even further.

In Josh Bassett’s first season with Wasps, he made 15 appearances

©David Howlett

“I still remember the first presentation at the Hilton in Ealing, they showed us the map and where we were going.

“Being there for this whole process, and there are only a few of us left, sometimes you have to explain to the guys that it wasn’t like this before and not take it for granted.

“We didn’t have a base, we were renting a stadium, all those little things, and seeing how well the club did, and it’s up to Derek [Richardson] and everyone on the board because this club was very close to not existing just before I arrived.

“I’m sure when it first happened there were fans who were very skeptical about it, but I think you look at CBS, it’s an amazing stadium and now you look at the center epic training, it’s amazing what the club has done, having its home and its roots now, it allows the club to develop and really grow.

In the past, Kevin Harman [Wasps’ Head of Recruitment and Academy] told TRU how he considered Launchbury, Sam Jones, Christian Wade, Elliot Daly and Joe Simpson to be the backbone of the club, but only the former remains.

Re-establishing their academy system in the Midlands, the team now see Barbeary, the Willis Brothers, Charlie Atkinson, Gabriel Oghre and Sam Spink emerge and this group of players have the ability to take the club to the next level rather than Wasps who rely heavily on imports from other Premiership clubs and even further afield.

Bassett’s importance to Blackett is also evident, the 30-year-old is a constant on the team roster, and he’s always honest about what the team has given him. He’s made nearly 200 appearances, launched a drinks brand, Socialalong with Brad Shields and former teammate Jake Cooper-Woolley is godfather to his second son.

“It’s changed quite a bit, from being pretty calm and sitting in the corner, being in various groups around leadership, being in advocacy meetings and being able to give your experience and your opinion and I certainly don’t take not that for granted,” he said.

“It’s been a lot of hard work to get to this point, and there have been bumps in the road, but what I’m looking at is all the experiences I’ve had, and if you can see me adding anything thing, that’s what I want to do because I love this club.

“I’ve been here for nine seasons and I want it to continue. It’s such a big club, and now it has its base, I’m so excited for the future.”

That future begins now with a trip to fifth place in the Top 14 at Mamut Stadium. Having faced Gloucester, Dragons, Perpignan, Benetton, Worcester and more recently Glasgow in the competition, Bassett for his part is ready to take up the challenge that Pierre Mignoni’s team will pose to him on Saturday.

“They are in good shape,” he said. “You look at how they played against Glasgow at the weekend, and they came to life in the last 20 minutes. They’re at home, in front of their supporters, it’s going to be hot, it’s another artificial pitch, and all those factors are taken into account.

“The main thing is that it is a European semi-final, and these games are not repeated often. You have to work so hard to put yourself in this situation and we have made it a point this season to make sure that everyone enjoys the week and that everyone enjoys it.

“It took a lot of work this season to get this opportunity, and it’s something we’re excited about. Going to Europe, to France, it’s exciting. It’s what you want to get involved in as a club. and as a player.

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MRIdian’s clinical and research experience showcased in nearly 40 abstracts at ESTRO 2022, Europe’s leading radiation oncology congress https://mact-asso.org/mridians-clinical-and-research-experience-showcased-in-nearly-40-abstracts-at-estro-2022-europes-leading-radiation-oncology-congress/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:02:03 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/mridians-clinical-and-research-experience-showcased-in-nearly-40-abstracts-at-estro-2022-europes-leading-radiation-oncology-congress/ ViewRay celebrates 10 years as the first and only company to offer real-time tissue tracking with automatic beam triggering and will host a symposium luncheon highlighting new MRIdian A3i features CLEVELAND, May 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY) today announced that the company’s MRIdian MRI-guided radiation therapy system will be featured at the […]]]>

ViewRay celebrates 10 years as the first and only company to offer real-time tissue tracking with automatic beam triggering and will host a symposium luncheon highlighting new MRIdian A3i features

CLEVELAND, May 6, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY) today announced that the company’s MRIdian MRI-guided radiation therapy system will be featured at the annual meeting of the European Society of Radiation Therapy and Oncology (ESTRO ), with nearly 40 presentations and posters showcasing the clinical and research experience of MRIs. This year’s ESTRO meeting will take place May 6-10, 2022 online and in person in Copenhagen, Denmark.

MRIdian-focused presentations and posters, submitted by MRIdian clinical teams around the world and accepted into ESTRO Scientific Sessions, highlight the clinical value of MRIdian in treating a wide variety of cancers, including pancreas, prostate, liver, rectum, cervix and central/ultracentral lung tumors. Other topics covered include patient satisfaction, cost/benefit analysis and one-day MRI treatments.

On Friday, May 6 to 12:30 p.m. CEST GenesisCare will host a symposium titled “A Revolution Guided by MR”, featuring MRI users from GenesisCare, Amsterdam UMC, Miami Cancer Institute, University Hospital Munich, Moffit Cancer Center and UCLA discuss innovations in MR-guided radiotherapy and its usefulness in lung, gastrointestinal and urological cancers. The event will take place in person at the Admiral Hotel in Copenhagen and streamed live for virtual attendees. Registration available at bit.ly/3y98pZw.

MRIdian A3i* is ViewRay’s 4th generation of real-time tissue tracking with automatic beam triggering, now paired with new treatment delivery capabilities focused on improving the efficiency of tabletop adaptive workflow and expanding clinical utility. ViewRay will organize a lunch symposium on Saturday May 7 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. CEST in Hall D1 titled “MRIdian A3i* – ViewRay’s Latest Innovations in MR-Guided RT”. The presentation, which will be given by Drs. Frank Lagerward, Miguel Palacios (Amsterdam UMC), and Drew Moghanaki (UCLA).

This symposium will highlight MRIdian A3i features including MR imaging sequences, automated workflow steps, automatic benchtop contouring tools, multiplanar tissue tracking, and automated beam synchronization, as well as ability of clinicians to work collaboratively during patient treatments. The symposium will also discuss ViewRay’s new brain processing package.

This month brands 10 years since ViewRay introduced real-time tissue tracking with automatic beam triggering. To date, MRIdian customers have treated over 21,000 patients using this feature on over 200,000 fractions. MRIdian remains the first and only system to offer real-time tissue tracking with automatic beam synchronization.

Visitors to ViewRay’s booth #1050 can also see demonstrations and presentations of MRIdian A3i* and the new brain processing package. They can also hear first-hand experience from clinicians around the world highlighting the benefits of MRIdian in treating various cancers, including:

Saturday May 7

  • SMART MRI scanner for lung cancer: Dr. Stephen RosenbergMoffitt Cancer Center
  • MRIdian SMART for the treatment of Lattice in liver: Dr. Enis Özyar, Acibadem Maslak Hospital

Sunday May 8

  • SMART MRI for oligometastatic cancer: Dr. Lauren Henke, University of Washington
  • SMART MRI scanner for the heart: Dr. Luca BoldriniGemelli
  • Synthetic CT with MRI images: Dr. David CusumanoMater Olbia Hospital

Monday May 9

  • MRI solutions for pancreatic cancer: Dr. Michael ChuongMiami Cancer Institute
  • MRIdian SMART for Liver SABR: Dr Agnès Tallet, Paoli-Calmettes Institute, Marseilles
  • MRI solutions for prostate cancer: Dr. Philippe CamilleriGenesisCare Oxford

Over 21,000 patients have been treated with MRIdian. Currently, 50 MRI systems are installed in hospitals around the world where they are used to treat a wide variety of solid tumors and are the subject of many ongoing research efforts. MRIdian has been the subject of hundreds of peer-reviewed publications, scientific meeting abstracts and presentations. For a list of treatment centers, please visit: https://viewray.com/find-mridian-mri-guided-radiation-therapy/

* MRIdian A3i features are only for sale in the United States, and the information contained herein regarding these features is for demonstration purposes only and may not be offered for sale until applicable regulations are met .

Warning:
The opinions and clinical experiences discussed herein are specific to the physicians featured and are for informational purposes only. Nothing in this document is intended to provide specific medical advice or to replace written law or regulation. The treatment results presented in this press release are not indicative of typical or future results.

Security statement
The MRIdian Linac system is not suitable for all patients, including those who are not candidates for magnetic resonance imaging. Radiation therapies can cause side effects that can vary depending on the part of the body being treated. The most common are usually temporary and may include, but are not limited to, irritation of the respiratory, digestive, urinary, or reproductive systems; fatigue; nausea; skin irritation; and hair loss. In some patients, side effects can be serious. Treatment sessions can vary in complexity and duration. Radiation therapy is not appropriate for all cancers. You should discuss the potential for side effects and their severity and the benefits of radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging with your doctor to make sure radiation therapy is right for you.

About ViewRay
ViewRay, Inc. (Nasdaq: VRAY) designs, manufactures and markets the MRIdian® MRI-guided radiation therapy system. MRIdian is built on a proprietary high-definition MR imaging system designed from the ground up to meet the unique challenges and clinical workflow of advanced radiation oncology. Unlike MRI systems used in diagnostic radiology, MRIdian’s high-definition MRI has been specifically designed to address specific challenges including beam distortion, skin toxicity, and other issues that can arise when high magnetic fields interact with beams of radiation. ViewRay and MRIdian are registered trademarks of ViewRay, Inc.

Forward-looking statements
This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act. Statements in this press release that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, among other things, ViewRay’s financial forecast for the full year 2022, expected future orders, expected future operational and financial performance, treatment outcomes, therapy uptake, innovation and performance of MRIdian systems. Actual results could differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements due to many factors. These factors include, among others, the ability to commercialize the MRIdian Linac System, demand for ViewRay’s products, ability to convert backlog into revenue, timing of delivery of ViewRay’s products, timing, and the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, including its impacts on our business on demand, our operations and our global supply chains, supply disruptions or changes in the costs of raw materials, labor labor, product components or transportation services due to inflation, results and other uncertainties associated with testing, the ability to raise additional funds necessary to continue to pursue business and product development plans of ViewRay, the inherent uncertainties associated with the development of new products or technologies, competition in the industry in which ViewRay operates and the general market conditions. For a more detailed description of the risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ from those expressed in these forward-looking statements, as well as risks relating to ViewRay’s business generally, see ViewRay’s current and future reports filed with of the Securities and Exchange Commission, including its annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021 and its quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, updated periodically along with the company’s other filings with the SEC. These forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this press release, and ViewRay undertakes no obligation to update the forward-looking statements, or to update the reasons why actual results could differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements. , except as required by law.

View original content: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mridian-clinical-and-research-experience-featured-in-nearly-40-abstracts-at-estro-2022-the-leading-european – meeting-radiotherapy-oncology-301541244.html

SOURCE ViewRay, Inc.

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Mel Bailey https://mact-asso.org/mel-bailey/ Wed, 04 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/mel-bailey/ More than 2,000 miles south of where the Franco-Malian director Ladj Ly earned an Academy Award nomination for the thrilling internationally acclaimed drama, Wretched, is the most recent of the three film schools opened by the director. The Kourtrajmé Film School (Ecole Kourtrajmé), named after the collective Ly co-founded in France, is based in Senegal’s […]]]>

More than 2,000 miles south of where the Franco-Malian director Ladj Ly earned an Academy Award nomination for the thrilling internationally acclaimed drama, Wretched, is the most recent of the three film schools opened by the director. The Kourtrajmé Film School (Ecole Kourtrajmé), named after the collective Ly co-founded in France, is based in Senegal’s metropolitan capital, Dakar, and centers on a concept of community learning initiated by the director himself – designed to inspire future generations of budding Africans. filmmakers.

Located in the hectic, multi-storey landscape of the Plateau, downtown Dakar, Kourtrajmé Film School is housed inside an art space, known as Agence TRAMES, a artistic and cultural center founded in 2018. It is the third in a family of film schools founded by Ly and co-founder, filmmaker and actor Toumani Sangare – after Montfermeil, in the Paris suburbs, as well as another in the southern city of Marseille.

The school is open to all students, whatever their background or level of studies.

Sangare and his wife Emma are co-directors of the school, and Franco-Senegalese star Omar Si is a mentor. The idea was originally to open the school in Mali, where Sangaré and Ly’s parents are from, but as Sangaré told RFI, security concerns have stalled those plans.

“The school is free, without the prerequisite of having a diploma, specifies Emma Sangaré. “During lessons, they [the students] must be available, and in Dakar. They are selected for their motivation and originality in what they offer.

Whether these students present a different point of view, a very strong character, or a visually compelling method of capturing their story, 14 aspiring screenwriters and 18 aspiring film producers are chosen to work together to produce several short films and a pilot. of the series, for two six-month sessions.

Rising screenwriter Salimata Dieme is part of this year’s class. “The story I want to tell is about a girl who is really into rap music,” she says. OkAfrica. “You see how rap is often rejected by the elite, but the music denounces certain things in society, in particular how the bourgeois live. I want to show the dichotomy between these two worlds. Especially since the parents of this girl [in my story] I don’t want her to get into rap music.

Dieme sees himself in this scenario; she comes from a family that pushed for her professional development outside of the creative realm. Her experience in finance pushed her to look for an opportunity like the Kourtrajmé film school. She hopes that after her time there, she can make her mark on the African film scene.

The young screenwriter Salimata Dieme is one of this year’s students at the Kourtrajmé film school in Dakar.

Photo: Mel Bailey

“Women directors and producers are really missing in our space [in Africa], they are really just behind the scenes; you don’t really see them producing or directing, sometimes you find them writing, but you don’t really see them directing things. Not really the way we should,” she adds.

The Kourtrajmé association, which is French slang for short film, is based on the principle of inspiring a community through creativity and providing young aspiring screenwriters and producers with the tools they need to succeed in the world. cinema, at no cost to them.

During the first half of the year, students take classes that help them with advanced storytelling techniques, including the “big reveal,” used to build tension and act as the film’s pivotal moment. Focused on the importance of community learning, classes are never just work and no play.

Resounding laughter following comedic commentary can be heard from time to time during class, alternating with harsh criticism aimed at questioning specific elements of a storyline or character development.

An image of a class in session at the Kourtrajmu00e9 film school.

The Kourtrajmé association, which is French slang for short film, is based on the principle of inspiring a community through creativity and providing young aspiring screenwriters and producers with the tools they need to succeed in the world of movie theater.

Photo: Mel Bailey

For Sangaré, working in a collective is essential in this industry, so it is natural that the courses take place in this way. “It’s not something you can’t do alone; it’s an area where you pass on to others,” she says. “The films are written, then revised, the dialogues are developed, then passed to the comedian, who adds color and emotion, then rewritten. If you don’t have the ability to work together to leverage each other’s strengths and expertise, to influence your work and make it stronger, then this field is not for you. We encourage students to understand this way of working; listen, and do our best to arm them with the ability to work in this way.”

Over the months, screenwriting students continue to work to structure the living elements of their screenplays by going through different exercises, including identifying a clear goal for their main character. It is hoped that their scripts will then be selected for the next round of creative aspiring producers and directors to work on.

For students like Mamadou, this form of coaching is invaluable. “The most interesting thing I’ve learned so far is that ideas aren’t set in stone,” he says. “Despite all the preconceived ideas I may have about an idea or my project, we can still do better and make it happen in a different way. It helps to bring out the vision, to make it stronger.”

Although the Dakar film school is still very young, opening its doors for the first time on January 17, its directors have already received calls for projects from producers on the part of students.

Image from a press conference with the founders of the Kourtrajme film school in Dakar.

Toumani Sangare (2nd L), director and founder of the Kourtrajme Dakar film school, attends a press conference with his collaborators Modibo Diawara (L), Jean Mze Ahmed (2nd R) and Ladj Ly (R) at the Dakar film school on January 19, 2022.

Photo: Seyllou/AFP via Getty Images

“It’s really encouraging,” says Sangaré. “This means that these students will have a lot of possibilities. Since we are supported by the AFD (French Development Agency) and the INA (National Audiovisual Institute), which allows us to have a status and a positioning in the field, people come to us because they know that we have notoriety.”

Giving students a head start in the industry is a by-product of the school’s network and the support it offers once students have completed their courses. “[We] help their work get sent to festivals, and follow their personal projects to move them forward. It’s really a family so it’s not like after the session is over we don’t talk to them anymore. We will always keep in touch and give them contacts, and also give them the opportunity to pitch to other great producers that they will have the chance to meet; we will not let them continue without any support afterwards,” adds Sangaré.

The concept of collective and accessible learning is appreciated by all parties involved, but being a free school comes at a cost. “All of our funding comes from international donors, and we struggle to find local funding,” explains Sangaré. ” It is a problem. It would be great to find more local funding. We’re so focused on telling the stories of the continent with the people here, and we’re so focused on the local environment, yet no one sees the added value of investing in that… Africa doesn’t seem to want to invest in itself for itself. And this way of working – always looking for foreign investors for donations, is not sustainable; we are here and it is not for nothing.”

Yet classes continue – every day of the week – with exchanges between local teachers and Sangaré herself, in a friendly atmosphere, full of laughter, with well-placed critiques and plenty of space to question ideals. and grow.

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How the popularity of peanuts spurred slavery and upended agriculture https://mact-asso.org/how-the-popularity-of-peanuts-spurred-slavery-and-upended-agriculture/ Tue, 03 May 2022 09:43:24 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/how-the-popularity-of-peanuts-spurred-slavery-and-upended-agriculture/ Award-winning journalist Jori Lewis, a former EHN contributor and researcher based in Dakar, Senegal, has just published Slaves for Peanuts: A Story of Conquest, Liberation, and a Harvest that Changed History. Lewis presents 19th century Senegal at a time of turmoil. It explores how French colonialism and the demand for peanut oil in Europe created […]]]>
Award-winning journalist Jori Lewis, a former EHN contributor and researcher based in Dakar, Senegal, has just published Slaves for Peanuts: A Story of Conquest, Liberation, and a Harvest that Changed History.


Lewis presents 19th century Senegal at a time of turmoil. It explores how French colonialism and the demand for peanut oil in Europe created a peanut boom with lasting repercussions on Senegalese agriculture and reinforced a system of slavery that persisted long after France l banned in the territories it held.

EHN spoke with Lewis about his book and his writings on agriculture and the environment in Senegal today.

How was groundnut traditionally grown in West Africa and how did it become a major export crop to Europe?

The peanut originated in South America, where it evolved and spread across the continent. It was probably brought back quite early by the Spanish and Portuguese conquistadors to Europe, and from Europe to Africa. Groundnut was grown on a small scale and in vegetable gardens with other food supplements…so not on the same scale as cereals like millet or folio in Senegal, but probably grown like okra or cowpea.

It developed once there was a demand for peanut oil in Europe during the industrial revolution. They needed oil to maintain their machines and steam engines. Before oil, they also needed oil for lighting. And, of course, they were killing whales for oil. A society that kills large marine mammals for oil obviously needs a lot of oil. But then the main driver became the soap industry. Peanut oil has very similar chemical properties to olive oil and could be substituted up to a certain percentage in the Marseille’s soap.

In the 19th century, the Wolof kingdom of Kajoor, between Dakar and the French coastal archipelago of Saint Louis, became the center of the groundnut boom and needed more and more people to work the land as demand grew. was increasing. Explain the connection between the peanut boom and slavery.

Kajoor’s sandy soil environment was perfect for groundnut. I knew there had been a more robust peanut economy there for a long time; Kajoor peanuts were so popular in Europe. Was it the peanut that created the expansion of slavery? In West Africa, there were people who were born slaves. But there was a demand for labor in Kajoor, and that brought people enslaved by the war. Why was there war? Partly because of economic developments linked to the European presence and capitalism.

The person who becomes an important vehicle for telling this larger story is Walter Taylor, a missionary in St. Louis who founded a haven for slaves and had to deal with colonial authorities turning a blind eye to slavery to protect economic interests. , even though France abolished slavery in 1848. How did you realize that Taylor had the potential to carry a lot of history?

I had read a book about slavery in the 19th century, and there was a brief reference to a Sierra Leonean Protestant missionary named Walter Taylor, who established a haven for runaway slaves in St. Louis. I discovered that this black missionary from a territory under British control had 20 years of letters with the direction of the mission in Paris.

Although Taylor worked, in a way, for the colonial enterprise, he had an equally interesting history as a black man in a white-dominated colonial system, as an English speaker in the French-speaking world, and as a that son of freed slaves who’d grown up in a community of people who had been freed. I became a bit obsessed with his story.

There was a movement of inland slaves trying to get to Saint Louis as a kind of promised land. But the process of claiming freedom was administratively difficult. Runaway slaves who arrived had to register with the city and say, “I declare that I have the right to my freedom. But then they had to wait three months. And during those three months, a slave owner could come and claim that person.

The court preferred that people not bring these cases to court, so that a slave master could find the person and say, “I can leave you alone if you pay for your freedom.” But who has so much money? Then Walter Taylor had the idea of ​​making a collection in the church. He realized that there was an opportunity to evangelize among this group, which was open to the mission because it had helped them.

Taylor was trying to build a career in the mission. He needed converts. But as someone who grew up in a community of liberated people, I think he really cared about them and their stories resonated with his on a deeper level.

Another strong but contrasting character to Taylor is Lat Joor, the damel, or king, of Kajoor. What was his story?

Lat Joor became a damel, was expelled by the French, and then returned through questionable methods and betrayals. He sought influence to keep his throne. He thought for a while that the French might be a tool to help him do this – before he started to understand, as perhaps all colonized people will eventually understand, these people aren’t there to help you , they are there to take your land.

Lat Joor had many slaves. I found letter after letter in which he wrote to the [colonial] governor or commander to say, “Please give me back my slave. But Lat Joor is an epic and heroic figure in Senegalese history because of his resistance to colonization. I think my book shows that this resistance has not always been direct. There was collaboration before there was resistance.

You write about wanting to ensure that the voices of slaves and others who are not well represented in the historical record are part of this book – a difficult task. How did you find their stories?

I wanted to include female voices and others who weren’t part of the elite. I also wanted to include the voices of the slaves. I found stories in mission records and court records, stories of how they became slaves and how they became free. Trying to tell this story from that perspective was really important to me, especially because sometimes an approach to African folk history tends to create hero stories as a fix – a very sensitive fix – to hundreds of years denigration of African culture and history. But I also wanted to show the whole story, to say that we have complicated stories about people who aren’t just good or bad, because we’re all complex characters with different motivations, who at different points in time err on the side of good or evil.

What is the conversation in Senegal today about sustainable agriculture and food sovereignty?

I see Senegalese agriculture developing, trying to resemble American or European agriculture. The same ideas of industrialized agriculture predominate. There are some small moves here, but what Senegal probably needs is extreme regenerative agriculture, and I don’t particularly see that happening. I see the agriculture industry is largely business as usual — fertilizers, pesticides. Modernize. It’s something you hear often, which means becoming like the industrialized agriculture of America, Europe, China or even India. All have their imprimatur on the way Senegal envisions its agricultural system.

The baobab makes many appearances in your book. You also wrote a nice essay on the baobab recently for Emergence Magazine. What does this mean to you?

The baobab is so ubiquitous in the history and understanding of Senegal. But at the same time, it’s so in danger. When I travel to Senegal, I think of all those lost trees and how much history they represent, because baobabs are long-lived, almost like redwoods. It’s even hard to fix our imagination on what it means to be in the presence of a millennial or two thousand year old tree, isn’t it?

Our human living memory is only 110 years old. But the baobab — how long does the living memory of this tree last? It’s amazing to imagine the number of changes humanity has gone through in these 2,000 years.

Thinking about this long view of history brings out the role of climate, which also lurks in the background of your book and invites us to reflect on our current condition.

In a few chapters I mention a period called the “hunger years,” brought on by cyclical drought. People were subject to the vagaries of the natural environment that drove them to make political or economic decisions. You would see more conflicts sometimes, people migrate to the city. It’s really interesting to get an overview of the story and see how the climate is its own character in the book.

Today we are so isolated, especially in America. But even in Senegal, a certain class of people is really isolated from the reality of the climate. What is the long term impact? We just keep cutting things back, not paying attention to what the signals are telling us.

The climate is one of them, but our political decisions are more often than not what determines access to food, security, water, all of that, which brings us back to Slaves for Peanuts. Unknowingly, the French soap consumer was leading to continued enslavement in Africa. It is important to understand how our choices impact the larger system, the larger world.

Lewis’s book is published by The New Press and available from independent booksellers and online sellers large and small.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Macron happy to dive into the transfer saga around Mbappé https://mact-asso.org/macron-happy-to-dive-into-the-transfer-saga-around-mbappe/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 10:01:41 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/macron-happy-to-dive-into-the-transfer-saga-around-mbappe/ Since Emmanuel Macron became President of France in May 2017, it’s been a bit like the golden age of French sport. In 2024, the Summer Olympics will come to Paris, 100 years after they were last held in the city in 1924. In 2018, France won the FIFA World Cup in Russia, their second title. […]]]>

Since Emmanuel Macron became President of France in May 2017, it’s been a bit like the golden age of French sport.

In 2024, the Summer Olympics will come to Paris, 100 years after they were last held in the city in 1924. In 2018, France won the FIFA World Cup in Russia, their second title. This year, France won the Six Nations with an impressive Grand Slam performance and will be one of the favorites for the Rugby World Cup, also hosted in France, next year.

In 2017, Macron pledged to “strengthen the place of sport” at the heart of French society. Five years later, after being elected ahead of far-right candidate Marine Le Pen, Macron will now see these big events as president.

Reports say Macron speaks to the superstar regularly without intermediaries and during the coronavirus pandemic he asked Mbappé to encourage young people to get vaccinated

Football is the most popular sport in France, and Macron has always sought to use being a fan to his advantage, underscoring his love for Olympique de Marseille, traditionally the best-supported club in France. Macron attends the Coupe de France final every year, and like Boris Johnson, Macron was quick to denounce plans for the European Super League even though no French teams were taking part in the plans.

The image of a pro-European and pro-international diplomacy is at the heart of Macron’s selling point. Having failed to convince Vladimir Putin of the abyss of war in Ukraine, Macron embarked on a much less serious, but nonetheless complicated, world of multimillion-euro football transfer negotiations, mainly the transfer saga surrounding France’s most famous sportsman, Kylian Mbappé.

Astronomical figures are quoted to keep Mbappé at Qatar-funded Paris Saint-Germain, a signing fee of £150million if he puts pen to paper on a two-year contract extension. At this point, Mbappe has refused to sign a contract to stay in Paris, with Spanish giants Real Madrid expected to top the list of suitors. Mbappé said he would remain silent on his decision until the end of the Ligue 1 season on May 21.

Opportunity

Macron, who is not one to miss an opportunity to get involved in a major talking point, took the unusual step of intervening in an attempt to persuade the Les Bleus star to stay at the Parc de Princes, contacting him personally and by making it public that he wanted Mbappé. continue to play his club football in France. It doesn’t matter that he urges the best player of his ‘beloved’ Marseille rivals to stay in Ligue 1.

“Unfortunately, we can’t talk about Kylian Mbappé who goes to OM [Marseille]. If he was willing to come, I would have fought to make it happen…but he said “not that far”. So it is better to fight for him to stay in Ligue 1,” Macron said.

<a class=French President Emmanuel Macron and French striker Kylian Mbappé. Photography: Jean Catuffe/Getty” height=”391″ src=”https://www.irishtimes.com/polopoly_fs/1.4865211!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_620/image.jpg” width=”620″/>

French President Emmanuel Macron and French striker Kylian Mbappé. Photography: Jean Catuffe/Getty

Last year, Macron said it was important that Mbappé stay “for the club, for the French Championship”, while saying “I will never put pressure on a player, it’s an intimate, personal choice. which I respect, it’s a career development”.

On another occasion, Macron spoke highly of Mbappé, saying he “demonstrates the qualities of the greatest: lucidity, courage, resistance”.

In the searing 2019 French drama Les Misérables (unrelated to the popular musical), which is set right after France’s World Cup victory, Mbappe’s name is regularly thrown around by the black teenagers of Montfermeil, who will later be involved in a heavy police day. violence in the crucible of the suburbs. The fortunes of Mbappé, the son of an immigrant turned national hero, stand in stark contrast to the troubled, impoverished teenagers and ensuing violence in the film.

Mbappé’s stature in France among young people is seen as invaluable to the French government, his success offering hope to millions and distracting attention from government failures in deprived northern suburbs. Reports say Macron speaks to the superstar regularly without an intermediary and during the coronavirus pandemic he asked Mbappé to encourage young people to get vaccinated.

Cultural icon

Mbappé is a commercial juggernaut in France, and already a cultural icon of Paris. The boy of Cameroonian and Algerian parents from Bondy who became one of the world’s biggest stars, a trip to Paris will see Mbappé littered with billboards, TV ads for companies like Hublot and Nike, while his image is ahead of the sport’s biggest video game, EA’s Fifa Sport Soccer Series. According to the Spanish newspaper La Cuatro, the French president has offered to Mbappé’s entourage to make him the ambassador of the French delegation to the 2024 Olympics.

It had become accepted that Mbappé would leave PSG for Real Madrid to pursue his career despite not signing a new contract with PSG last summer, to test himself in a stronger league and give himself a better chance. chance to win the Champions League. Despite winning Ligue 1, this season was seen as a failure for PSG, although their star still shines with 33 goals in 42 games.

Macron is an image-driven politician (as seen when he suddenly ditched his traditional navy suit for stubble, jeans and a hoodie in leader-style ‘war room’ photos Ukrainian Volodymyr Zelenskiy), and understands that sport brings collective happiness. A happy electorate is more likely to want things to stay the same. Or so the logic goes. Just ask Charlie Haughey or Shane Ross.

Despite Mbappé’s good terms with Macron, he did not follow fellow French players Dimitri Payet and Blaise Matuidi in backing Macron in the election against Le Pen. But if Macron’s latest attempt helps keep Mbappé in Paris, it will be the perfect start to his sports-focused tenure and next five years as president.

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Partial but significant return of tourists to Morocco and Tunisia https://mact-asso.org/partial-but-significant-return-of-tourists-to-morocco-and-tunisia/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 09:38:33 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/partial-but-significant-return-of-tourists-to-morocco-and-tunisia/ MOROCCO/TUNISIA. In Morocco, as in Tunisia, the tourism sector is preparing for a summer of recovery. After two catastrophic seasons in 2020 and 2021, 2022 will probably not reach the level of 2019, with 13 million tourists over the year, but will be part of a recovery phase. In 2021, Morocco only welcomed four million […]]]>

MOROCCO/TUNISIA. In Morocco, as in Tunisia, the tourism sector is preparing for a summer of recovery. After two catastrophic seasons in 2020 and 2021, 2022 will probably not reach the level of 2019, with 13 million tourists over the year, but will be part of a recovery phase. In 2021, Morocco only welcomed four million visitors.

According to the Moroccan National Airports Office, passenger traffic should only drop by 25% compared to the summer of 2019. Airlines are creating or reopening 48 lines (England, Italy, Spain, France, etc.) and certain platforms such as Tetouan, Tangier or Oujda anticipate an “air traffic resumption rate” of more than 100%.

Since the reopening of airspace in February 2022, booking rates have increased to regularly exceed 85%, i.e. pre-covid figures. The maritime sector amplifies this return to normal with the resumption of traffic between Spain and Morocco in April, after two blank years.
In Tunisia, tourism professionals are also smiling. The number of travelers is up 50% in the first quarter of 2022 compared to the same period in 2021 according to the Ministry of Tourism. In April, the rate reached +150%. But this will not be enough to reach a correct level. In 2022, Tunisia should still see its attendance drop by 50% compared to 2019.

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Launch of an international laboratory dedicated to artificial intelligence in Montreal https://mact-asso.org/launch-of-an-international-laboratory-dedicated-to-artificial-intelligence-in-montreal/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://mact-asso.org/launch-of-an-international-laboratory-dedicated-to-artificial-intelligence-in-montreal/ Montreal-center brings together the forces of McGill universityÉTS, Mila, CNRS, Paris-Saclay University and CentraleSupélec MONTREAL, April 26, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – A consortium of research organizations has come together to form a new International Research Laboratory (IRL) focused on artificial intelligence (AI) in Montreal. The new center brings together McGill universitySchool of Higher Technology (ETS), […]]]>

Montreal-center brings together the forces of McGill universityÉTS, Mila, CNRS, Paris-Saclay University and CentraleSupélec

MONTREAL, April 26, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ – A consortium of research organizations has come together to form a new International Research Laboratory (IRL) focused on artificial intelligence (AI) in Montreal. The new center brings together McGill universitySchool of Higher Technology (ETS), Mila – Quebec AI Institute, France National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Paris-Saclay University and Ecole CentraleSupélec. The move confirms from Montreal leader status in AI.

Although great progress has been made recently in the field of AI, there is still a pressing need for new theoretical knowledge to better understand not only the capabilities of this new technology, but also how it achieves its results. ILLS will focus on five main research themes: fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence, sequential (real-time) machine learning, robust autonomous systems, natural language and speech processing, and applications to computer vision, signals and information processing.

In addition, the new center will emphasize interdisciplinary collaborations with the aim of developing new methodologies and integrating these techniques into learning systems.

“This new laboratory confirms from Montreal global leadership in AI,” said Benoit BouletAssociate Vice-Principal, Research and Innovation at McGill university. “This is a major hub with a talent pool that continues to deepen, and McGill researchers and students are integrated at all levels of this activity. This new initiative will provide our researchers with opportunities to make even more groundbreaking discoveries.”

“ÉTS’s expertise in AI includes several laboratories and research chairs in artificial intelligence. This collaboration between France and Quebec allows us to innovate and deepen research in AI, a cross-cutting discipline that we can benefit from in many fields, including health, the built environment, robotics and the Internet of Things. It is therefore with pride that ÉTS welcomes the new ILLS center within its establishment,” said Christian Casanovadirector of research and partnerships at ÉTS.

“Through its international cooperation tools, the CNRS supports the most promising joint cutting-edge research projects. The new international research laboratory brings together a powerful network of researchers France and Quebec to advance knowledge and applications of AI. For the CNRS, this new laboratory is also an opportunity to strengthen its ties more broadly with the entire Canadian AI community,” said Anthony SmallChairman and CEO of the CNRS.

“AI at Paris-Saclay involves nearly 1,000 researchers, teacher-researchers, engineers and technicians and around forty laboratories, grouped together within our DataIA Institute. We will make our contribution to ILLS in the form of mobility researchers, including the reception of Canadian colleagues at Paris-Saclay, the reception of Master’s trainees, the financing of theses in particular/among others… The University of Paris-Saclay is honored and proud to be associated with this signing ceremony for the creation of the IRL ILLS and to ensure its joint supervision” adds Michel Guidal, Deputy Vice-President of Science and Engineering for Research at the University of Paris-Saclay.

“The ILLS, resulting from an unprecedented and international union, offers unique potential for progress in the field of AI. It is an honor for CentraleSupélec to participate with our prestigious partners in this laboratory. On the strength of this research, our teaching will thus be at the forefront of the world in terms of AI,” adds Romain Soubeyran, director of CentraleSupélec.

ILLS will join a booming artificial intelligence (AI) industry in Montreal, which has attracted other major government and corporate investments in recent years. As a result, the city is one of the world’s leading hubs in this field, with around 27,000 workers in AI-related technologies and more than 14,000 post-secondary students enrolled in AI-related study programs. AI.

The ILLS is the last laboratory of this type to have been launched in Canadaprecisely in Quebec. In 2014, the CNRS and the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Nature et technologie (FRQNT) signed a letter of intent to support and promote the tradition of scientific cooperation that exists between France and Quebec. This collaboration resulted in the creation of two international research laboratories in Quebec, as well as other shared research activities across the province. The CNRS has also set up three other IRLs in Canada in partnership with other institutions.

Were present at the signing ceremony: Frédéric Sanchez (Consul General of France), Remi Quirion (of Quebec Scientific Director), Anthony Small (CNRS), Suzanne Fortier (McGill university), Francois Gagnon (ETS), Michel Guidal (Paris-Saclay University), Franck Richecoeur (Ecole CentraleSupélec), and Laurence Beaulieu (Mila).

On McGill university

Founded in Montreal, Quebecin 1821, McGill university is from Canada top-ranked medical graduate university. McGill is consistently ranked among the top universities, both nationally and internationally. It is a world-renowned institution of higher education with research activities spanning three campuses, 11 faculties, 13 professional schools, 300 study programs and over 39,000 students, including over 10,400 graduate students. McGill attracts students from over 150 countries around the world, with its 12,000 international students representing 30% of the student body. More than half of McGill students report having a mother tongue other than English, with approximately 20% of our students reporting French as their mother tongue.

About ÉTS

The École de technologie supérieure is one of the ten components of the Université du Québec network. It trains engineers and researchers recognized for their practical and innovative approach, the development of new technologies and their ability to transfer their knowledge to businesses. Nearly a quarter of all engineers in Quebec are graduates of ÉTS, which has 11,000 undergraduate and graduate students, as well as 27,000 graduates. ÉTS specializes in applied training and research in engineering and maintains a unique partnership with the business community and industry.

About the CNRS

The National Center for Scientific Research is one of the most recognized and renowned public research institutions in the world. For more than 80 years, it has met a demand for excellence in terms of recruitment and has developed multi- and interdisciplinary research throughout the territory, in Europe and internationally. Oriented towards the common good, it contributes to the scientific, economic, social and cultural progress of France. The CNRS is above all 32,000 women and men and 200 professions. Its 1,000 laboratories, most of which are shared with universities, schools and other research organizations, represent more than 120,000 people; they advance knowledge by exploring living things, matter, the Universe and the functioning of human societies. The close link it weaves between its research activities and their transfer to society makes it a key player in innovation today. Partnership with companies is the basis of its promotion policy. It is available in particular through nearly 200 joint structures with industrial players and through the creation of around a hundred start-ups each year, testifying to the economic potential of its research work. The CNRS makes research work and data accessible; this sharing of knowledge is aimed at different audiences: scientific communities, media, decision-makers, economic players and the general public.

About Paris-Saclay University

The University of Paris-Saclay brings together ten faculties and constituent institutes, four Grandes Écoles, the Institute of Advanced Scientific Studies, two associated establishments and joint laboratories with national research organizations. It is ranked among the top 20 research universities in the world. With 48,000 students, 8,100 lecturer-researchers and 8,500 administrative and technical staff, Université Paris-Saclay offers a complete and varied offer of training courses from undergraduate to doctoral level and engineering degrees, recognized for their quality thanks to the reputation and commitment of the University’s academic staff. Located south of Paris on vast sites which extend ParisOrsay, Evry and Versailles, the University of Paris-Saclay benefits from a strategic geographical and socio-economic position reinforced by its international visibility. A leading university, Université Paris-Saclay is recognized for its excellent training in Mathematics and Physics, but also for Biological and Medical Sciences, Agriculture, Engineering, and its in-depth training in Human and Social Sciences. Near ParisParis-Saclay University is nestled in a protected natural area, at the heart of a dynamic economic hub.

About Centralesupelec

CentraleSupélec is a public establishment of a scientific, cultural and professional nature, created in January 2015 of the merger of École Centrale Paris and Supélec. Today, CentraleSupélec is made up of 3 campuses in France (Paris-Saclay, Metz and Rennes). It has 4,300 students, including 3,200 engineering students, and brings together 17 laboratories or research teams. Strongly internationalized (30% of its students and almost a quarter of its teaching staff are international), the school has forged more than 170 partnerships with the best institutions in the world. A major school of higher education and research, CentraleSupélec is a reference center in the field of engineering sciences and systems, ranked among the best institutions in the world. It is a founding member of the University of Paris-Saclay and chairs the Groupe des Ecoles Centrales (Lyons, Lille, Nantes and Marseilles), which operates international sites (beijing (China), Hyderabad (India), casablanca (Morocco)) .

SOURCESchool of Higher Technology

For further information: Media contacts: Junji Nishihata, McGill University, T: 514-396-1166, C: 514-839-7030, [email protected]; Jean-Alexandre D’Etcheverry, School of Higher Technology (ETS), T: 514 910-1328, [email protected]

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